Q&A: Those IRS coronavirus-extended deadlines apply to more than just taxes

Dear Liz: Now that we’re not required to file our taxes until July 15 this year, has anything been said about pushing back the 2019 contribution deadline for IRAs and Roth IRAs?

Answer: The IRS recently confirmed that the deadline for making contributions to IRAs has also been extended to July 15. The deadlines were pushed back from April 15 because of stay-at-home orders and other disruptions stemming from the coronavirus outbreak.

You can contribute up to $6,000 to IRAs for 2019 if you’re under 50, or $7,000 if you’re 50 or older. The limits are the same for 2020.

You didn’t ask, but the deadline for contributing to a health savings account also has been extended.

HSAs allow people with qualifying high-deductible health insurance plans to put away money that can be used tax-free for eligible medical expenses. The maximum amount individuals can contribute to an HSA is $3,500 for individual coverage and $7,000 for family coverage. The “catch up” provision for people 55 and older allows an additional $1,000 contribution.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 7 credit card rules you can break in an emergency. Also in the news: How Gen X can start tackling its credit card debt, 6 tips to help your portfolio weather the coronavirus crash, and how to prep for and spend your government relief check.

7 Credit Card ‘Rules’ You Can Break in an Emergency
Times are different.

How Gen X Can Start Tackling Its Credit Card Debt
Don’t put it off any longer.

6 Tips to Help Your Portfolio Weather the Coronavirus Crash
Slow and steady.

How to Prep for and Spend Your Government Relief Check
Getting the most from your check.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Laid off due to Coronavirus? Take these 6 steps. Also in the news: NerdWallet Experts’ tips on handling finances during coronavirus, my experience flying from Mexico to the U.S. during the Coronavirus pandemic, and how to make a will during the Coronavirus lockdown.

Laid Off Due to Coronavirus? Take These 6 Steps
Keeping your head above water.

NerdWallet Experts’ Tips on Handling Finances During Coronavirus
Advice from the pros.

My Experience Flying from Mexico to the U.S. During the Coronavirus Pandemic
It’s a different world.

How Do You Make a Will During the Coronavirus Lockdown?
Getting creative.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: You can now pause 2 student loan payments. But should you? Also in the news: A new episode of the SmartMoney podcast on the coronavirus, why you should be the friend who talks about money, and how long you should keep your tax documents.

You Can Now Pause 2 Student Loan Payments, But Should You?
Is it really worth it?

SmartMoney podcast: Coronavirus edition
How the virus impacts your money.

Be the Friend Who Talks About Money
Tough conversations that are worth having.

How Long Should You Keep Your Tax Documents?
Make copies of everything.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Relief checks may be coming, but scammers are already here. Also in the news: 3 ways credit cards can help you ride out a crisis, your student loan bill is still due during a pandemic, and how to save energy while you’re stuck at home.

Relief Checks May Be Coming, but Scammers Are Already Here
Scammers never miss an opportunity.

3 Ways Credit Cards Can Help You Ride Out a Crisis
Preserving your cash.

Your Student Loan Bill Is Still Due During the Pandemic
Interest is halted, but you still need to pay.

How to Save Energy When You’re Stuck at Home
Keeping your electric bill in check.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to protect your finances and credit in tough times. Also in the news: Squash these 4 common tax-season stresses, how to weather a market downturn during or approaching retirement, and how to handle – and head off – a tax bill.

How to Protect Your Finances and Credit in Tough Times
Prepare instead of panic.

Squash These 4 Common Tax-Season Stresses
How to overcome the 4 biggest stresses.

Retired or Nearly There? How to Weather a Market Downturn
Diversification is key.

How to Handle — and Head Off — a Tax Bill
Preparing in advance.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Your kids don’t want your stuff. Also in the news: Don’t become a victim of Coronavirus shopping frenzy, what to do if the Coronavirus is affecting your finances, and why you shouldn’t get too excited about cheap gas.

Your Kids Don’t Want Your Stuff
But don’t take it personally.

Don’t Become a Victim of Coronavirus Shopping Frenzy
Beware of price gouging.

What to Do if the Coronavirus Outbreak Is Affecting Your Finances
What companies are doing to help.

Don’t Get Too Excited About Cheap Gas
It’s only temporary.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How mortgage refinancing could save you money even if your loan is new. Also in the news: Where to stash your savings when cash management account rates take a dive, how to stock up wisely, emergency or not, and what the “history” part of your credit score really measures.

Mortgage Refinance Could Save Money — Even If Your Loan Is New
A typical refinance can save at least $150 a month.

Where to Stash Your Savings When Cash Management Account Rates Take a Dive
Taking a look at CDs and online accounts.

How to Stock Up Wisely, Emergency or Not
Stocking up strategically.

What the ‘History’ Part of Your Credit Score Really Measures
It isn’t just how long you’ve had credit.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Does my travel insurance cover the Coronavirus? Also in the news: 3 signs that itemizing your taxes may be worth the headache, types of home inspections you should know, and why you shouldn’t pay for credit repair piggy back scams.

Does My Travel Insurance Cover the Coronavirus?
What to know about your upcoming travels.

3 Signs That Itemizing Your Taxes May Be Worth the Headache
How to know when it’s worth the effort.

Types of Home Inspections Buyers Should Know
When you should call in more than one inspector.

Don’t Pay for Credit Repair ‘Piggyback’ Scams
There are better ways to boost your credit.