Q&A: How to avoid Medicare late enrollment penalties

Dear Liz: I am 65, still working and have health insurance through my employer. I have not enrolled for Medicare and have been told I do not need to. I plan to once I retire. There is a passage in my Social Security statement that says, “Because you are already 65 or older, you should contact Social Security to enroll in Medicare. You may be subject to a lifetime late enrollment penalty. Special rules may apply if you are covered by certain group health plans through work.” I have tried to research further through the Medicare website but can’t find a clear answer about whether or not I am OK not enrolling at this time.

Answer: If your employer has 20 or more employees, then you’re fine for now. When you stop working for that employer, you’ll have eight months to sign up for Medicare without owing penalties.

If you want your Medicare coverage to start when your job-based coverage ends, though, you should sign up a month before you retire. Similar rules would apply if you were covered by a spouse’s workplace health insurance plan. As long as your spouse is still working for the employer that provides the coverage, you can avoid permanent Medicare penalties.

If your employer has fewer than 20 employees, however, you may be required to sign up for Medicare when you’re first eligible. Check with your employer.

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Q&A: Revisiting a Medicare penalty

Dear Liz: As a county employee of 44 years, I was offered the option to contribute to Social Security in the mid-1970s. It was not mandatory and I declined. When I retired in 2004, I did not apply for Medicare as I wrongly assumed that I would not qualify. I have since learned that I can apply for Medicare but that I would have to pay $499 per month as a late enrollment penalty on top of the monthly premium. Do you know any way that I can get a portion of the late penalty waived?

Answer:
As your situation shows, not getting sound advice about Medicare can be expensive. Failing to sign up for Part B coverage, which pays for doctor’s visits, can incur penalties of 10% for each 12 months you were eligible but didn’t enroll. The penalties are typically permanent.

There is an appeals process, but your chances of success may not be great unless you can prove that you delayed enrollment because of bad advice you got from a government representative. Medicare has more information on its site.

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