Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to bank when you can’t go to the bank. Also in the news: Don’t fall for COVID-19 student loan relief scams, file your claim in the Yahoo data breach settlement by July 20, and how to hire a financial advisor who won’t rip you off.

How to Bank When You Can’t Go to the Bank
The pandemic has made in-person banking complicated.

Don’t Fall for COVID-19 Student Loan Relief Scams
Scammers are charging for free information.

File Your Claim in the Yahoo Data Breach Settlement by July 20
But don’t get too excited about the amount.

How to Hire a Financial Advisor Who Won’t Rip You Off
Trusting the right advisor.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 3 ways to skip your bank’s long phone lines. Also in the news: Keeping your credit in shape, even if you don’t have debt and don’t plan to borrow, 25 ways to save yourself from your debt disaster, and how to set up a 60/40 budget.

3 Ways to Skip Your Bank’s Long Phone Lines
When phone wait times are long, try to reach your bank via live chat, Twitter or message instead.

Keep your credit in shape, even if you don’t have debt and don’t plan to borrow
Good credit is important year-round.

25 Ways To Save Yourself From Your Debt Disaster
Climbing out of the debt hole.

How to Set Up a 60/40 Budget
Focus on two buckets.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Is my money safe in a bank during the COVID-19 crisis? Also in the news: Helping home buyers keep their distance with e-closings, what kinds of credit card relief are available during the pandemic, and how to save for retirement while on unemployment.

Is My Money Safe in a Bank During the COVID-19 Crisis?
Should you be worried about your accounts?

Mortgage E-closing: Helping Home Buyers Keep Their Distance
Changes during the pandemic.

COVID-19: What Kinds of Credit Card Relief Can You Request?
Several options are being offered.

How to Save for Retirement While on Unemployment
Saving for the future is still important.

How to ask your bank or lender for help

Many banks, credit card issuers and other lenders have promised to help those impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. They’re offering to defer or reduce payments and waive interest charges and rebate fees for those who have lost jobs, had their hours reduced or otherwise lost income to the COVID-19 crisis.

The help usually isn’t automatic, however. You have to ask for it — and ask the right way.

In my latest for the Associated Press, the important questions to ask your bank or lender.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to make a student loan complaint that gets results. Also in the news: How to keep your spirits up in the long game of saving, how ex-offenders can rebuild with a bank account, and these airlines will let you change your flight for free because of Coronavirus.

How to Make a Student Loan Complaint That Gets Results
Effective complaints.

How to Keep Your Spirits Up in the Long Game of Saving
Sticking it out.

How Ex-Offenders Can Rebuild With a Bank Account
How to start over.

These Airlines Will Let You Change Your Flight for Free Because of Coronavirus
Don’t forget to wash your hands.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Concerned about Coronoavirus? How to prepare your house, mind and bank account. Also in the news: 3 ways Millennials are getting money right, what to buy (and skip) in March, and 6 moves to make if you’ve saved more than $1,000 in your checking account.

Concerned About Coronavirus? How to Prepare Your House, Mind and Bank Account
Practical steps.

3 Ways Millennials Are Getting Money Right
Forget the avocado toast trope.

What to Buy (and Skip) in March
Deep discounts on tax software.

If You’ve Saved More Than $1,000 in Your Checking Account, Make These 6 Moves
Don’t let it sit there.

Should you shift to a cash management account?

High-yield cash management accounts are popping up at brokerages nationwide, promising customers much better returns and higher insurance limits than they can get from traditional banks.

The accounts are a twist on the sweep accounts brokerages have long offered their customers, where idle cash is swept into a money market account or affiliated bank account so it can earn interest while waiting to be reinvested.

In my latest for the Associated Press, more on high-yield cash management accounts and how to decide if one is right for you.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How ex-offenders can rebuild with a bank account. Also in the news: Determining how much you should spend on rent, how to have a baby even if you’re worried you can’t afford it, and how to handle awkward financial conversations.

How Ex-Offenders Can Rebuild With a Bank Account
Starting over.

How Much Should I Spend on Rent?
How to determine what you really can afford.

How to have a baby, even if you’re worried you can’t afford it
Advice from new parents and financial experts.

How to handle that awkward financial conversation
When to swallow your pride.