How to create your retirement glide path

In investing terms, a “glide path ” describes how a mix of investments changes over time. Typically, the mix gets more conservative — with fewer stocks and more bonds, for example — as the investor approaches a goal such as retirement.

You also can create a glide path into retirement by making gradual changes in your working and personal life in the months or years before you plan to quit work. Retirement can be a jarring transition, especially if you haven’t set up ways to replace the structure, sense of purpose and socializing opportunities that work can bring, says financial coach Saundra Davis, executive director of Sage Financial Solutions, a nonprofit financial education and planning organization in San Francisco.

“People are excited to leave (work), but then once they leave, they feel that pressure of ‘How do I define myself?’” Davis says. “‘Am I important now that I’m no longer in the workforce?’”

In my latest for the Associated Press, learn how to create your retirement glide path.

This week’s money news

This week’s top story: Smart Money podcast on data breaches, and catching up on retirement savings. In other news: How airline elite status saved the day when airline delays and cancellations strike, which airline elite status should you go for in 2023, and how pay transparency may affect your job search or next raise. Smart Money […]

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Q&A: Why you need to pay attention to your credit utilization

Dear Liz: Recently my granddaughter gave birth to twins. I’d like to put $500 into a trust for each of them to mature when they are 18. I’m hesitant to set up an education fund in case they decide not to go on to college. I would like something that includes growth and safety, the least […]

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Q&A: Checking survivor benefit eligibility

Dear Liz: I was widowed at 44, when my children were 10 and 12. I received Social Security benefits for myself and for them for a time. I then went back to work. I started taking Social Security at 65 even though I continued working until 70. I hear a lot about widows’ benefits and wonder […]

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How to tackle holiday debt in January

After years of being in debt, Rachel Kramer Bussel came to a realization: “If I don’t become proactive about it, I will be in debt for the rest of my life.” For Bussel, a freelance writer near Atlantic City, New Jersey, that meant scaling back spending and putting any available money toward the debt principal. […]

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Q&A: Why you need to pay attention to your credit utilization

Dear Liz: Our credit scores are in the low 800s. We always pay all credit card balances off before the next billing period. We are presently charging a cruise for us and our daughter and her husband. We’re worried about using too much of our available credit and thus reducing our credit scores. We’re using one […]

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This week’s money news

This week’s top story: Smart Money podcast on investing in 2023. In other news: Small-business trends 2023, privacy hacks that may hurt your credit, and how to avoid hotel resort fees. Smart Money Podcast: Your Money in 2023: Investing in the Stock Market This week’s episode is all about investing in 2023. Small-Business Trends: 6 Predictions […]

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Q&A: Estate taxes on house bequests

Dear Liz: You recently wrote about the capital gains tax implications when someone sells a house they’ve been given, versus one they’ve inherited. Would you elaborate on the estate ramifications for the donor if that person has a large estate? Would their estate pay tax on the gift? Answer: Few people have to worry about either gift or estate […]

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This week’s money news

This week’s top story: How to get paid for surviving the Southwest meltdown. In other news: Smart Money podcast on January money moves, and paying off your mortgage early, 4 ways to improve your odds of meeting new year’s money goals, and the path of mortgage rates prior to Fed meeting. How to Get Paid for […]

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Sneaky ways inflation affects your money in 2023

By now, you’re probably familiar with the more obvious ways inflation affects your finances. Your money doesn’t go as far at the grocery store, for example. Credit card and other variable-rate debt is getting more expensive as the Federal Reserve raises short-term interest rates to combat inflation. Rates are also rising, albeit more slowly, on savings accounts. […]

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