Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 4 ways to manage retirement health care costs. Also in the news: 6 ways to budget using your bank account, how to save money with Amazon and Walmart prescription discounts, and how much money you need to live on your own, in each state.

4 Ways to Manage Retirement Health Care Costs
Strategies to help control medical costs.

6 Ways to Budget Using Your Bank Account
Your bank account can do more than store your money. It can help you control your spending, too.

How to Save Money With Amazon, Walmart Prescription Discounts
The discounts can be substantial. But if you have insurance, consider your copay and deductible.

How Much Money You Need to Live on Your Own, in Each State
Using the living wage tool.

How to make budgeting as painless as possible

Budgeting is a pain. But what’s more painful is a bill you can’t easily pay, debt that costs a fortune or not having enough money to retire.

Fortunately, you can have a useful, working budget without watching every penny. Automation, technology and a few simple guidelines can keep you on track. In my latest for the Associated Press, finding the budget plan that best suits your needs.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Ditching debt while budgeting for a baby. Also in the news: What to do if Hurricane Florence hits your home and/or mortgage, five people who are crushing student debt, and what you can learn from the last financial crisis to help you with the next.

How I Ditched Debt: Changing Habits, Budgeting for a Baby
A shift in priorities.

What to Do If Hurricane Florence Hits Your Home, Mortgage
The Category 4 storm is heading towards the Carolinas.

Meet 5 People Who Are Crushing Student Debt
Tips from the masters.

Here’s what you can learn from the last financial crisis that will help you with the next
Planning ahead.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Budgeting for college students. Also in the news: What to do when the GI Bill won’t cover college, 6 ways to travel cheaply, and why frugal retirees are ditching the 4% rule and hoarding their savings instead.

Budgeting for College Students: Where to Start
You don’t have to live on ramen.

What to Do When the GI Bill Won’t Cover College
Finding alternatives.

6 Smart Ways to Travel Cheaply
You don’t have to go overboard.

Frugal retirees ditch 4% rule, hoard savings instead
Why they’re making this choice.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: A guide to who needs life insurance. Also in the news: Budgeting for new parents, planning a summer family vacation, and how to still afford a house while spending all your money on avocado toast.

A Guide to Who Needs Life Insurance
Do you?

Budgeting for New Parents: From Day Care to College
Covering the next 20+ years.

It’s Not Too Late to Plan a Summer Family Vacation
Plenty of time still left.

How to Afford a House When You’re Spending All Your Money on Avocado Toast
You can keep your toast, Millennials.

Americans Are Pissed — This Chart Might Explain Why

iStock_000087400741_SmallPeople are angry. Voters demanding change have helped make Donald Trump the presumptive Republican nominee for president and fueled Bernie Sanders’ ferocious challenge to Democrat Hillary Clinton.

But what are they angry about? Ask and you’ll hear about Washington gridlock, Wall Street greed, trade, stagnant pay, immigration. In my latest for NerdWallet, the one huge factor that’s making this election especially unique.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

emergency-fund-1940x900_36282Today’s top story: Debunking emergency fund myths. Also in the news: How filing separately could give some couples a lower tax bill, the financial benefits of living with less, and how much down payment you should have to buy a home.

Debunking 5 Emergency Fund Myths
Separating fact from financial fiction.

Filing Separately Could Give Some Couples a Lower Tax Bill
Splitting up your tax returns could save you money.

The Financial Benefits of Living With Less
Downsizing your way out of debt.

How Much Down Payment Do You Need to Buy a Home?
How much do you really need?

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: What you can learn from your 2015 tax returns. Also in the news: Getting the most from mobile banking, using the 50/20/30 rule for your budget, and the number one thing Americans plan to do with their tax refunds.

What You Can Learn From Your 2015 Tax Return
Revealing info on your investments.

Mobile Check Deposits: Pro Tips to Ensure They Go Smoothly
Getting the most from a convenient way of banking.

This Is the No. 1 Thing Americans Do With Their Tax Refund
The answer may surprise you.

Use the 50/20/30 Rule to Outline Your Budget For Every Need
Proportioning your expenses.

Wonder Why You’re Broke? Look in the Driveway

Rockhead126's_1951_Mercury_CustomIf you’re struggling to make ends meet, your problem may not be too many lattes or dinners out. It may be sitting in your driveway.

Your monthly car payment is the tip of the iceberg.

Counting gas, registration and taxes, depreciation, tires, insurance and finance charges, Americans spend $8,700 a year on average — $725 a month — for the privilege of owning a typical midsize sedan, according to AAA, and more than $10,600 a year for an SUV. If you’re struggling with bad credit, the increased cost of financing and insurance will push those numbers even higher.

In my latest for NerdWallet, how to determine if you have too much car in your driveway.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

321562-data-breachesToday’s top story: How to avoid an identity theft double whammy. Also in the news: How much you need to save for retirement, signs you need help managing your money, and how to tell that your financial plan is working.

How to Keep Scammers From Pulling an ID Theft Double Whammy
Look out for phony identity theft assistance.

How Much Should You Save for Retirement?
Four methods that can help you estimate how much you need to save.

21 Signs You Need Help Managing Your Money
Knowing when it’s time to call for backup.

How Do You Know Your Financial Plan Is Working?
Signs of progress.

10 Ways to Take the Fear Out of Budgeting
It doesn’t have to be scary.