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retirement-savings3Today’s top story: How to prepare your finances for the end of the year. Also in the news: Strategies to prevent holiday shopping binges, why your employer wants you to save for retirement, and what to do as you approach retirement.

5 Year-End Personal Finance Tips
Preparing for the new year.

3 Strategies to Prevent a Holiday Shopping Binge
Keeping the festivities in check.

The Surprising Reason Employers Want You to Save for Retirement
It’s all about productivity.

5 things to do now if you’re near retirement
Start preparing for one of life’s biggest changes.

7 Money Myths About Millennials
Millennial mythbusting.

Categories : Liz's Blog
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bank_fee1Today’s top story: Beware the dirty tricks of student loan collectors. Also in the news: Tax tips, the best strategy for holiday shopping, and busting some digital banking myths.

Watch Out for These Student Loan Debt Collectors’ Dirty Tricks
Stay on your toes.

Beat the Crowd With This Smart Year-End Tax Move
Understanding capital losses.

Top 5 Digital Banking Myths
Time for some mythbusting.

The Best Strategies for Your Final Holiday Shopping Countdown
The war plan for holiday shopping.

3 Things I Wish I Knew Before Taking Out Student Loans
Hindsight is your best friend/worst enemy.

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Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailI recently used the College Board’s “estimated family contribution” calculator to see how much we’ll be expected to pay when our (currently pre-teen) daughter heads off to college.

The answer? Roughly half our annual incomes. Each year.

No colleges actually charge the amount we’d theoretically be expected to pay. So our out-of-pocket costs would be somewhat less. But the exercise drives home how important it is to run these numbers, early and often, if you want a college education for your kids that doesn’t bankrupt you, and them.

Because I know how the formulas work, I was able to tweak some numbers to lower our EFC. Moving more money into retirement accounts and using savings to pay down the mortgage helped a lot with the federal formula, and helped some with the institutional formula (which, unlike the federal, counts home equity). We still wouldn’t get any need-based help from most colleges but could get some breaks if our daughter gets into one of the most-expensive elite schools. (The total cost of the average public college is $20,000 to $25,000; $40,000 for privates and $60,000 for elites.)

If we didn’t have a fat college savings account, we likely would steer our daughter toward public schools or privates willing to offer merit scholarships to reduce the total cost. It’s much better to start a college search knowing what you can afford than to have to tell your kid, dream school acceptance letter in her hand, that you can’t send her there. Or worse, that you will–and then never be able to retire.

For more about how financial aid formulas work, read my Reuters column this week: “A guide to figuring out the real cost of college.”

 

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homebuyerToday’s top story: How to financially prepare for winter. Also in the news: How to determine if you should rent or buy a home, how to keep student loans from ruining your life, and how to avoid gift card fraud during the holidays.

8 Ways to Tackle Winter Money Challenges With Ease
How to reduce heating costs and holiday expenses.

Know Your “Rent-to-Price” Ratio When Deciding If You Should Buy a Home
How to determine if you should consider buying vs renting.

7 ways to top student loans from ruining your life
Taking charge of your loans.

How to Avoid Gift Card Fraud This Holiday Season
Protecting your purchases.

When You’re Most Likely to Get a Call From a Debt Collector
Prepare yourself.

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Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailAmerican Express’ “Small Business Saturday” credits are back, and they’re more lucrative this year: a $10 statement credit for purchases of $10 or more at qualifying small businesses on Nov. 29. You can get up to $30 in credits on each registered card.

I signed up three of our Amex cards yesterday when registration opened, which means we’re now eligible for $90 in statement credits. I then checked the list of small businesses in our neighborhood where we can use the credits, and sketched out what I plan to buy where. I’ll get a chunk of my Christmas shopping done, while also picking up supplies I was planning to buy anyway.

Free money is always good, and free money to support the businesses that support our community is even better.

Amex says registration for the cards is limited, so hop to it. You can use the “Amex offers for you” tab in your online Amex account or the ShopSmall.com site. Using “offers for you” tab seems to preclude you from registering more than one card, but it appears you can register additional cards at the ShopSmall site. Make sure to read the offer terms so you understand how the credits work and what type of transactions don’t qualify (such as transactions made with an electronic wallet, through a third party or if the merchant uses a mobile or wireless card reader to process the transaction).

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22856641_SAToday’stop story: For a low-cost college education, consider moving to these places. Also in the news: Celebrating your small financial victories, the hype surrounding Black Friday, and why more Americans are having a tough time making ends meet.

The Best and Worst Places to Live for a Low-Cost College Education
Planning ahead.

Celebrate Your Small Financial Wins for Better Savings Motivation
Small victories quickly add up.

5 Black Friday Deals That Aren’t (and 3 That Should Be)
Don’t believe the hype.

America’s Top Money Problem: Trying to Make Ends Meet
More Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.

Everything You Need to Know About Down Payments
When to take that giant leap.

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Dear Liz: My nephew was persuaded by a recruiter to attend a for-profit technical college. Then, once he entered, his “advisors” persuaded him to take many, many classes — at full price — always handing him student loan paperwork to get more loans. Then they persuaded him to change his major, necessitating a whole new round of classes and loans to pay for them.

The problem is my nephew has Klinefelter syndrome, a genetic disorder. He was not diagnosed until he was an adult and therefore was left with a mental age of about 12. This is what made him so gullible. He did graduate but in the six years since has not been able to find work because it is obvious to employers that he is mentally challenged. Now his training is becoming obsolete, making jobs even harder to get. This means there is no way he will ever be able to pay back the thousands of dollars in loans. Klinefelter is listed in the disabilities registers, but because he can function, any kind of aid is really hard to get. Do you have any advice on what to do about the looming debt?

Answer: The questionable tactics of some for-profit colleges have prompted regulatory investigations and lawsuits. That doesn’t mean the debt that affected students accumulated will be easy to erase.

Many for-profit colleges rely heavily on federal student loans for their funding. If your nephew’s loans are federal, he might be able to qualify for a total and permanent disability discharge of his federal loans, said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of EdVisors, a college resource site.

“He will need a doctor to certify that his disability prevents him from obtaining gainful employment,” Kantrowitz said. “He will also need to earn less than the poverty line annually for the three-year post-discharge monitoring period.”
Kantrowitz has more information about such discharges on his site.
Another option is to consult an attorney, Kantrowitz said. “If he lacked the mental capacity to enter into a contract, he might be able to repudiate the loans,” Kantrowitz said.

Your nephew also may be able to discharge the loans in bankruptcy, Kantrowitz said. Typically student loans can’t be erased this way, but there are exceptions, including one woman in Maryland who was able to erase $340,000 in law school and other education debt after a judge said her Asperger’s syndrome made it impossible for her to hold a job.

“The odds of success are low, but many of the successful discharges involved disabilities, especially when the loan program did not provide for a disability discharge,” Kantrowitz said.

A final possibility, if your nephew has federal student loans, is to sign up for an income-based repayment program. If his adjusted gross income is less than 150% of the poverty line, his required payment would be zero and he would be eligible for the discharge of his debt after 25 years.

Categories : Q&A, Student Loans
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Dear Liz: You’ve answered a number of questions regarding credit card debt when a person dies. But I haven’t quite seen the answer I need. If a spouse dies, and the remaining spouse is not on the credit card account, is it still the responsibility of the survivor to pay the card? Does the answer vary by state? Or is it a federal law?

Answer: As you read in previous columns, the dead person’s assets are typically used to pay his or her debts. If there aren’t enough available assets to pay the creditors, those creditors may be able to go after the spouse in certain states and certain circumstances.

In community property states such as California, debts incurred during a marriage are typically considered to be owed by both parties. Other community property states include Arizona, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin. In the rest of the states, a spouse’s debts are his or her own, unless the debt was incurred for family necessities or the spouse co-signed or otherwise accepted liability.

Collection agencies have been known to contact spouses, children and other family members and tell them they have a legal or moral obligation to pay the dead person’s debts, regardless of state law. If you are married to someone with significant debt, contact an attorney to help you understand and perhaps mitigate your risk.

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imagesToday’s top story: How to store and protect your personal financial information. Also in the news: How financial fear can be your ally, keeping your kids out of debt, and how to plan for retirement when your employer doesn’t offer one.

How to store personal financial information
Keeping your information private and safe.

4 ways financial fear can be your ally
Becoming friends with fear.

How to help your children stay out of debt
Setting the right course.

A Basic Guide to Retirement Plans When Your Employer Doesn’t Offer One
Making the process less daunting.

Can I Consolidate Federal & Private Student Loans Together?
Combining your student loans.

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471x286xdebt-collector.jpg.pagespeed.ic.N0bBKkAfMqToday’s top story: How to handle frustration with your financial advisor. Also in the news: Making your frequent flier miles work harder, easing your anxieties over savings, and what to do with the 401(k) from your last job.

What to Do When You’re Fed Up With Your Financial Advisor
It’s time for a sit-down.

Make Frequent Flier Miles Work Better for You, in Just 2 Steps
Getting the most you can from the airlines.

Is Outliving Your Savings a Fate Worse Than Death?
How to ease your anxieties.

This Cartoon Shows You What to Do With the 401(k) From Your Last Job
Making the process easier to understand.

Is Your Life Insurance Worthless?
Don’t put your policy at risk.

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