Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Apps that encourage you to spend. Also in the news: Advice for weaning your grown kids off your credit cards, why some people don’t mind overpaying the IRS, and how to protect yourself from falling interest rates.

These Types of Apps Could Prompt Impromptu Spending
You don’t need extra help spending money.

Advice for weaning your grown kids off your credit cards
Time to cut them loose.

Here’s why these people don’t mind overpaying the IRS
Yes, you read that correctly.

How to Protect Your Savings From Falling Interest Rates
A few options.

Q&A: Adding a child as a credit card user

Dear Liz: I’ve read that adding a child as an authorized user on your credit card could help build his or her credit history. But I was specifically told that this was not the case, as the child’s Social Security number was not primary.

Answer: Whoever told you may not have understood how authorized user activity typically is reported, or may have been talking about a specific issuer’s policy.

Adding someone as an authorized user to a credit card typically results in the history for that card being added to the authorized user’s credit report. That in turn can help the authorized user build credit history and improve his or her credit scores.

Some smaller issuers, such as credit unions or regional banks, may not report authorized user activity to the three credit bureaus, but all of the major credit card companies do. Some of these big issuers, however, don’t report the information if the authorized user is younger than a certain age or if the information is negative. The age cutoff varies by issuer. For American Express and Wells Fargo, for example, it’s 18; for Barclays, it’s 16 and for Discover, it’s 15. Other major issuers don’t have an age cutoff. American Express and U.S. Bank also won’t report to the authorized user’s credit file if the account is delinquent.

The credit bureaus, in turn, have their own policies. TransUnion includes whatever the issuers report. Equifax adds the information to the credit report if the authorized user is at least 16. Experian adds the information supplied by the issuers, regardless of age, but will remove it if the original account becomes “derogatory” — which typically means payments are skipped or the account is charged off.

If you want to help a child build credit by adding the child as an authorized user, you’ll want to make sure you’re adding him or her to a card that will actually do some good. A quick call to the issuer can help you find out its policy on reporting authorized user activity.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 4 student loan refinancing myths debunked. Also in the news: Colleges that will pay for your degree through work, Sallie Mae launches credit cards aimed at millennials, and why you should stay away from wedding loans.

4 Student Loan Refinancing Myths Debunked
How to determine if it’s the right move for you.

These Colleges Will Pay Tuition, but You’ll Work for It
Trading labor for tuition.

Sallie Mae launches new credit cards aimed at millennials and Gen Z. Are they right for you?
Another Sallie Mae bill to pay.

Stay away from wedding loans
The bad way to say “I do.”

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Pension lump sum or annuity? How to decide. Also in the news: 7 things college freshmen don’t need – and 10 they do, how to get your credit card’s annual fee waived, and exactly how much it will cost to retire well in every state in America.

Pension Lump Sum or Annuity? How to Decide
The health of your fiscal plan is key.

7 Things College Freshmen Don’t Need — and 10 They Do
Skip the big TV.

How to Get Your Credit Card’s Annual Fee Waived
Get ready to spend some time on the phone.

This is exactly how much it will cost to retire well in every state in America
Planning ahead.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: What will long-term care cost you? Also in the news: Social Security myths, the best cities for first-time home buyers, and how to pay less to your credit card company.

What Will Long-Term Care Cost You?
Almost everyone will need it after 65.

Don’t Believe These Social Security Myths
Checking the facts.

These are the best cities for first-time home buyers
7 spots to look at.

Here’s how to pay less to your credit card company
Just pick up the phone.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Amazon, Synchrony launch credit builder card. Also in the news: 5 reasons to keep renting, 5 steps to consolidate your debt with a personal loan, and when to use cash instead of credit.

Amazon, Synchrony Launch Secured Credit Builder Card
Amazon targets the secured credit market.

5 Reasons to Keep Renting
More freedom?

5 Steps to Consolidate Your Debt With a Personal Loan
What you need to know.

When to Use Cash Instead of Credit
Going old school.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Chase brings back limits on Cardholders’ right to sue. Also in the news: 5 getaways within reach using Southwest’s latest sign-up bonus, how to save for retirement and pay your student loans at the same time, and 8 pieces of financial advice from college commencement speakers.

Chase Brings Back Limits on Cardholders’ Right to Sue
Binding arbitration has returned.

5 Getaways Within Reach Using Southwest’s Latest Sign-Up Bonus
Quick tickets for new customers.

How to save for retirement and pay your student loans at the same time
A budget that pays for the past and saves for the future.

8 Pieces of Financial Advice From College Commencement Speakers
Money lessons and career tips.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to get your credit disaster-ready. Also in the news: Watch your credit card rewards pile up with these 5 tips, comparing your 401(k) to the average, and what to know about buy now, pay later online loans.

How to Get Your Credit Disaster-Ready
Be financially secure when disaster strikes.

Watch Your Credit Card Rewards Pile Up With These 5 Tips
Stacking strategies.

How Does Your 401(k) Compare to Average?
How your company’s plan stacks up to the competition.

What to Know About Buy Now, Pay Later Online Loans
Pay attention to the fine print.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The lowdown on new tools to jump-start your credit. Also in the news: The new credit card that pays cash-back rewards for on-time payments, tuition discounts grow at private colleges and universities, and what to do in your 20s and 30s to be set in your 60s and 70s.

The Lowdown on New Tools to Jump-Start Your Credit
Learn how they work and if you should use them.

No credit history? This new credit card pays cash-back rewards for on-time bill payments
Introducing Petal.

Tuition discounting grows at private colleges and universities
Tuition costs are dropping.

What to do in your 20s and 30s to be set in your 60s and 70s
It’s never too early to prepare.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The average credit score is rising. Also in the news: 3 money-saving tips for buying a washer, a statute of limitations on student loans, and why you should always buy airfare on a credit card.

Credit Scores Are Rising — Is Yours, Too?
Every little bit matters.

Want to Clean Up? 3 Money-Saving Tips for Buying a Washer
Don’t get hung out to dry.

Is There a Statute of Limitations on Student Loans?
The answer is complicated.

Always Buy Airfare on a Credit Card
Additional protection.