Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 8 credit card strategies – and some surprises, too. Also in the news: The technophobe’s guide to cybersecurity, why the Apple Card could make you spend more, and why Cash App users should be on the lookout for scams.

8 Credit Card Strategies — And Some Surprises, Too
Using your cards strategically.

The Technophobe’s Guide to Cybersecurity
Protecting yourself and your data.

Why The Apple Card Could Make You Spend More
Chasing rewards and instant gratification.

Watch Out for Scams Targeting Cash App Users
Be alert.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 5 credit card changes coming soon. Also in the news: 4 ways to pay for college if your financial aid isn’t enough, the best credit cards for recent college grads, and the decline in house flipping profitability.

5 Credit Card Changes — With More Rewards, Less Fraud — Coming Soon
A sneak peek at what’s to come.

4 Ways to Pay for College If Your Financial Aid Isn’t Enough
You still have options.

The Best Credit Cards for Recent College Grads
Time to start building solid credit.

Is house flipping starting to flop? It’s “getting less and less profitable”
Return on investments reaches an 8-year low.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The 6 big retirement mistakes and one way to avoid them. Also in the news: Decode your credit card’s fine print like a pro, use caution when shopping with buy now/pay later, and avoid ATM fees by getting cash back at the store.

The 6 Big Retirement Mistakes — and One Way to Avoid Them

Decode Your Credit Card’s Fine Print Like a Pro
Terms you need to know.

Buying Now and Paying Later? Handle With Care
Proceed with caution.

Avoid ATM Fees By Getting Cash Back at the Store
Skip a stop and the fees.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: What to do if you lose your credit card. Also in the news: Chime and Varo launch free programs to pay account overdrafts, half of student loan borrowers fear they’ll be in debt forever, and why you should never spend the money a bank accidentally deposits into your account.

What to Do If You Lose Your Credit Card
Don’t panic, but act quickly.

Chime, Varo Launch Free Programs to Pay Account Overdrafts
New programs from the mobile banks.

Half of student loan borrowers worry they’ll be in debt forever, study finds
Graduates have major financial regrets.

If the Bank Accidentally Deposits Money in Your Account, Don’t Spend It
Fight the temptation.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Save more money for your next vacation with this simple trick. Also in the news: How LexisNexis identity mix-ups could be scrambling your finances, how to review your LexisNexis report and fix errors, and all the ways your credit card use reveals personal info.

Save More Money for Your Next Vacation With This Simple Trick
You won’t even miss the money.

LexisNexis Identity Mix-Ups Could Be Scrambling Your Finances
Your Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange could contain errors.

Check Yourself: How to Review Your LexisNexis Report and Fix Errors
Getting your information straight.

All The Ways Your Credit Card Use Reveals Personal Info
Privacy is a myth.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Apple Card officially debuts, adding new rewards categories. Also in the news: 5 credit card perks you may not know you have, how to neutralize the digital threat you carry everywhere, and the best credit cards for grocery shopping.

Apple Card Officially Debuts, Adding New Rewards Categories
The buzzy credit card has arrived.

5 Credit Card Perks (and Freebies) You May Not Know You Have
Hidden perks.

Neutralize the Digital Threat You Carry Everywhere
The threat in your pocket.

These Are The Best Credit Cards for Grocery Shopping
Get cash back on your grocery purchases.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Apps that encourage you to spend. Also in the news: Advice for weaning your grown kids off your credit cards, why some people don’t mind overpaying the IRS, and how to protect yourself from falling interest rates.

These Types of Apps Could Prompt Impromptu Spending
You don’t need extra help spending money.

Advice for weaning your grown kids off your credit cards
Time to cut them loose.

Here’s why these people don’t mind overpaying the IRS
Yes, you read that correctly.

How to Protect Your Savings From Falling Interest Rates
A few options.

Q&A: Adding a child as a credit card user

Dear Liz: I’ve read that adding a child as an authorized user on your credit card could help build his or her credit history. But I was specifically told that this was not the case, as the child’s Social Security number was not primary.

Answer: Whoever told you may not have understood how authorized user activity typically is reported, or may have been talking about a specific issuer’s policy.

Adding someone as an authorized user to a credit card typically results in the history for that card being added to the authorized user’s credit report. That in turn can help the authorized user build credit history and improve his or her credit scores.

Some smaller issuers, such as credit unions or regional banks, may not report authorized user activity to the three credit bureaus, but all of the major credit card companies do. Some of these big issuers, however, don’t report the information if the authorized user is younger than a certain age or if the information is negative. The age cutoff varies by issuer. For American Express and Wells Fargo, for example, it’s 18; for Barclays, it’s 16 and for Discover, it’s 15. Other major issuers don’t have an age cutoff. American Express and U.S. Bank also won’t report to the authorized user’s credit file if the account is delinquent.

The credit bureaus, in turn, have their own policies. TransUnion includes whatever the issuers report. Equifax adds the information to the credit report if the authorized user is at least 16. Experian adds the information supplied by the issuers, regardless of age, but will remove it if the original account becomes “derogatory” — which typically means payments are skipped or the account is charged off.

If you want to help a child build credit by adding the child as an authorized user, you’ll want to make sure you’re adding him or her to a card that will actually do some good. A quick call to the issuer can help you find out its policy on reporting authorized user activity.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 4 student loan refinancing myths debunked. Also in the news: Colleges that will pay for your degree through work, Sallie Mae launches credit cards aimed at millennials, and why you should stay away from wedding loans.

4 Student Loan Refinancing Myths Debunked
How to determine if it’s the right move for you.

These Colleges Will Pay Tuition, but You’ll Work for It
Trading labor for tuition.

Sallie Mae launches new credit cards aimed at millennials and Gen Z. Are they right for you?
Another Sallie Mae bill to pay.

Stay away from wedding loans
The bad way to say “I do.”

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Pension lump sum or annuity? How to decide. Also in the news: 7 things college freshmen don’t need – and 10 they do, how to get your credit card’s annual fee waived, and exactly how much it will cost to retire well in every state in America.

Pension Lump Sum or Annuity? How to Decide
The health of your fiscal plan is key.

7 Things College Freshmen Don’t Need — and 10 They Do
Skip the big TV.

How to Get Your Credit Card’s Annual Fee Waived
Get ready to spend some time on the phone.

This is exactly how much it will cost to retire well in every state in America
Planning ahead.