Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Spring travel ahead? One airline is prioritizing customer safety. Also in the news: Considering elite airline status in 2021, taking some of the mystery out of buying a house sight unseen, and how to build your credit without a credit card.

Spring Travel Ahead? One Airline Is Prioritizing Customer Safety
Delta is now the only major airline blocking middle seats on all domestic flights through the spring.

Is Airline Elite Status Worth Considering in 2021?
The requirements to earn elite status are lower this year, so it’s easier to get these perks for 2021 and 2022.

Take Some of the Mystery Out of Buying a House Sight Unseen
Finding the right agent and getting help from others on the ground can help you buy a house even if you can’t visit it in person.

How to Build Your Credit Without a Credit Card
Credit builder loans can help.

Q&A: How to help your adult kids build their own credit

Dear Liz: My first house is paid for, and my oldest daughter and her husband are living there now. I added her name to my credit card, which is paid in full every month, but otherwise she hasn’t established any credit. I have been paying the utilities up until now, but they are going to take them over. Will changing my name and direct debit bank information to theirs on the accounts help establish her credit?

Answer: Some alternative credit-scoring systems do use utility payments to supplement the information in people’s credit reports. Experian Boost, for example, allows people to add such payments and potentially increase their Experian credit scores. Still, your daughter would be smart to continue adding traditional credit accounts to her reports.

One way to do that is with something called a “credit builder loan,” which is offered by some credit unions and at least one online lender, called Self. Essentially, the applicant borrows a certain amount, which the lender puts in a savings account or certificate of deposit. The borrower can claim the money after making a certain number of payments. The payments are reported to the three credit bureaus, contributing to her scores.

She also could apply for a credit card on her own, to supplement the one you added her to. If her credit isn’t yet good enough to qualify for an unsecured card, she could consider getting a secured card that gives her a line of credit equal to the amount she deposits with the issuing bank.

Q&A: To build credit, try this set-it-and-forget-it trick

Dear Liz: I have little credit history and my Experian credit score is about 620. My wife has no credit history. We are in the process of increasing our creditworthiness. I have an unsecured credit card from my credit union. She will be getting a secured credit card. We will use these lightly and regularly, paying them off each month. Does using my credit card to pay a utility bill each month work for building credit?

Answer: Absolutely. As long as your credit cards report to all three credit bureaus, your on-time payments will build your scores.

To make things easier, you could set up a recurring charge and automatic payment. Utilities typically allow customers to pay their bills automatically with credit cards, and credit cards usually offer the option of paying automatically each month. You’re normally given three options: paying only the minimum, paying in full or paying a set dollar amount.

Recurring charges ensure your card shows regular activity, while automatic payment should eliminate the risk of missing a payment. A single skipped payment could be a significant blow to your credit scores.

Another option to consider is a credit builder loan, which many credit unions and community banks offer. Typically, the amount you borrow is placed into a savings account or certificate of deposit while you make payments.

When you’ve paid the loan in full, usually after 12 months, you claim the cash. The payments help build your credit, and the cash could be the start of an emergency fund.