Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The lowdown on new tools to jump-start your credit. Also in the news: The new credit card that pays cash-back rewards for on-time payments, tuition discounts grow at private colleges and universities, and what to do in your 20s and 30s to be set in your 60s and 70s.

The Lowdown on New Tools to Jump-Start Your Credit
Learn how they work and if you should use them.

No credit history? This new credit card pays cash-back rewards for on-time bill payments
Introducing Petal.

Tuition discounting grows at private colleges and universities
Tuition costs are dropping.

What to do in your 20s and 30s to be set in your 60s and 70s
It’s never too early to prepare.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Why your financial aid may plummet after freshman year. Also in the news: 3 tricks to help you shop less, how FICA tax and other withholding taxes work on your paycheck, and why you should plan to retire even if you don’t plan on retiring.

Why Your Financial Aid May Plummet After Freshman Year
Preparing yourself.

These 3 Tricks Can Help You Shop Less
Curbing an expensive habit.

How FICA Tax and Other Withholding Taxes Work on Your Paycheck
What they are and how you can change them.

Plan to Retire Even If You Don’t Plan to Retire
Plans have a way of changing.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: More parents are putting limits on college help. Also in the news: Mastercard’s new rule will make some “free” trials more transparent, what you need to know about SIPC insurance, and why you should be wary of new tricks for raising your credit score.

More Parents Are Putting Limits on College Help
Limiting contributions.

Mastercard’s New Rule Will Make Some ‘Free’ Trials More Transparent
Reminding you when the trial is up.

SIPC Insurance: What It Does and Does Not Protect
Covering your brokerage.

Be Wary of New ‘Tricks’ for Raising Your Credit Score
They could end up doing the opposite.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Having the talk about college costs with your teen. Also in the news: How the new tax law affects vacation homes, what to do when an airline loses your bag, and thinking twice before paying for accident forgiveness.

Having ‘The Talk’ About College Costs With Your Teen
Managing expectations.

How the new tax law affects vacation-home owners
It gets complicated.

What to Do When an Airline Loses Your Bag
Don’t panic.

Think Twice Before Paying for Accident Forgiveness
Premium increases vs. the cost of forgiveness

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to pay for college when you haven’t saved enough. Also in the news: How credit cards are fueling bigger gas savings, how to see the world in your 20s without racking up debt, and what rising mortgage rates will cost you if you’re looking to buy a home.

How to Pay for College When You Haven’t Saved Enough
All hope is not lost.

How Credit Cards Are Fueling Bigger Gas Savings
Savings at the pump.

How to See the World in Your 20s Without Racking Up Debt
The trip of a lifetime without a lifetime of debt.

Buying a home? Here’s what rising mortgage rates will cost you
State-by-state findings.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 4 ways to save on housing costs in your 20s. Also in the news: Billions in free college money went unclaimed this year, the complications of putting plastic surgery on your plastic, and how being lazy can actually help you save money.

4 Ways to Save on Housing Costs in Your 20s
Skipping avocado toast won’t cut it.

$2.6B in Free College Money Went Unclaimed by 2018 Grads
Fill out the FAFSA.

Putting Cosmetic Surgery on Your Plastic? Avoid These Complications
Sizing up the costs.

How being lazy can actually help you save money
Yes, you read that correcly.

Q&A: A reader’s college funding rules

Dear Liz: I’d like to share with other parents how my husband and I paid for college for our two daughters. We had three rules. 1. If an out-of-state or private college was chosen, then they would be required to pay us back the difference compared to an in-state public school. They both did opt for that and both paid us back every cent. 2. We would only pay for four years and not one more day. Get in, get out. Go to summer school and work jobs. 3. They would receive a monthly allowance of $100 only. Both daughters got a fabulous education, are grateful and felt they had invested in their future well. So did we and we are very proud of them.

Answer: As well you should be! Obviously, many parents can’t afford to be nearly as generous with their kids, but those who can be should think about putting limits on their generosity to make sure their progeny are motivated to get the most out of their education. One caveat: Getting a degree in four years has become increasingly difficult at many public colleges because of budget cuts. You don’t say when your daughters graduated, but today’s parents may need to keep that in mind when figuring out how much to contribute.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Why your kid should help pay for college. Also in the news: 5 reasons for flyers to love the middle seat, tips for Labor Day sales, and why you should prioritize building up your cash reserves.

Why Your Kid Should Help Pay for College
It’s their education, after all.

5 Reasons for Flyers to Love the Middle Seat
No, really.

Work Less, Save More at Labor Day Sales With These Tips
Bargain hunting.

Prioritize Building Up Your Cash Reserves
Creating a cushion.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 4 good ways to put your tax refund to work. Also in the news: 4 wats to speed up your tax refund, how 3 students got an education on the cheap, and Amazon may be getting into the banking business.

4 Good Ways to Put Your Tax Refund to Work
Use your refund to ease financial stress.

4 Ways to Speed Up Your Tax Refund
Skip the mailbox.

How 3 Students Got an Education on the Cheap
Avoiding years of debt.

Amazon’s next product may be a checking account
The online giant is eyeing banking.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to leverage great credit without borrowing a dime. Also in the news: How to get your taxes done for free, how to hang on to more cash, and how to save for your kid’s college and still live.

How to Leverage Great Credit Without Borrowing a Dime
Capitalizing on great credit.

How to Get Your Taxes Done for Free
Examinging the offers.

To Hang On to More Cash, Let Go of These in 2018
Time to get rid of those delivery apps.

How to Save for Your Kid’s College and Still Live
The saving doesn’t have to be painful.