Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Why the Good Enough home may just be perfect. Also in the news: How to turn your retirement plan into an early-retirement plan, how to mess up a variable annuity, and why it’s important to calculate the cost of college – not just tuition.

The ‘Good Enough’ Home May Be Just Perfect
Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good.

How to Turn Your Retirement Plan Into an Early-Retirement Plan
Tweaking your ideas about retirement.

How to Mess Up a Variable Annuity
Mistakes can be costly.

Calculate the Total Cost of College—Not Just Tuition
There’s a whole lot more to pay for than just classes.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Teach your teens about college costs long before they apply. Also in the news: Haggling for vacation souvenirs, getting cheap car insurance for new drivers, and what to do with unexpected money.

Teach Your Teens About College Costs Long Before They Apply
Prepare them for reality.

Save Money on Souvenirs: Learn to Haggle
Make a plan and stick to it.

Getting Cheap Car Insurance for New Drivers
Discounts can add up over time.

What to Do With Unexpected Money
Be methodical.

Teach your teen about college costs starting now

Many families struggle to pay college expenses for one or two kids. Certified financial planner Sarah Carlson, mother of two sets of twins, will soon have all four of her children in college at the same time.

The older twins are already there, to be joined soon by the younger two. But years ago, Carlson started teaching her children how to get an affordable education. One of the first steps was making clear what she would contribute.

“I let them know early on what I was comfortable spending and what I wasn’t,” says Carlson, who’s based in Spokane, Washington.

In my latest for the Associated Press, why you need to teach your teen about college costs long before the first application essay is written.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Money mistakes even smart people make. Also in the news: 3 reasons to choose a college based in price, the pros and cons of moving abroad for health care, and which state has the highest average credit card debt.

Money Mistakes Even Smart People Make
We all make them.

3 Reasons to Choose a College Based on Price
Spend less time in debt.

Should You Move Abroad for Health Care?
The pros and cons.

Where credit card debt is the worst in the US: States with the highest average balance
Where does your state rank?

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 3 reasons to choose a college based on price. Also in the news: 3 times you can pay taxes with plastic and come out ahead, 7 tax changes investors should watch for when they file, and why you should check your hospital bill against your explanation of benefits.

3 Reasons to Choose a College Based on Price
Avoiding high debt.

3 Times You Can Pay Taxes With Plastic and Come Out Ahead
Building card perks.

7 Tax Changes Investors Should Watch For As They File
Investors face several new changes.

Check Your Hospital Bill Against Your Explanation of Benefits
Billing mistakes are rampant.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Get to know your 401(k) plan. Also in the news: How one couple ditched debt, having the talk about college costs with your teen, and what to do if you’re affected by Marriott’s huge data breach.

Get to Know Your 401(k) Plan
Everything you need to know.

How I Ditched Debt: ‘We Have Choices Again’
One couple’s story.

Having ‘The Talk’ About College Costs With Your Teen
Keeping expectations in check.

What to Do If You’re Affected by Marriott’s Data Breach
Over 500,000,000 customers are affected.

Why your kid should help pay for college

I recently heard from the parents of yet another high school senior who turned down a huge scholarship from a good college to attend her “dream school,” which of course has lousy financial aid. Now her parents are scrambling, trying to figure out how to pay for it .

This madness must end.

Asking teenagers to pay the whole cost of a four-year college degree probably isn’t realistic or smart. Kids may be cut off from financial aid, since need-based help is largely based on the parents’ resources. The debt they accumulate may be crippling, and students who try to pay for school entirely on their own are more likely to drop out.

But the open bar approach isn’t wise, either. Setting limits and requiring a kid to pay at least part of the cost can actually lead to better grades while protecting parents’ finances.

In my latest for the Associated Press, why parents should set clear boundaries about how much they’ll pay for college.

Why “Get scholarships!” is bad advice

Student-LoansWe had a great Twitter chat today about preparing financially for college, hosted by Experian. (You’ll find the tweets using #creditchat.)

I was distressed, though, that many believe people should look for scholarships as a way to reduce college costs. That’s not how it usually works.

If you have financial need, colleges typically deduct the amount of so-called “outside” scholarships from the free aid such as grants and their own scholarships that they otherwise would give you. Schools don’t have to reduce the loan portion of your package unless your outside scholarships exceed the grants and other free aid they were planning to bestow.

They’re not just being mean. It’s what federal financial aid rules require, according to FinAid. If you don’t have financial need, outside scholarships could reduce the merit aid a school would otherwise give you.

Does that mean you shouldn’t search and compete for outside scholarships? No. But it’s certainly not a reliable solution to the college affordability problem.

A better approach for students and families is to look for generous schools. Colleges themselves are the greatest source of scholarships, but most don’t meet 100 percent of their students’ financial need. Some meet 70 percent or less. If you want a better deal, look for schools that consistently meet 90 percent or more of their students’ need. College Board and College Data are among the sites that can help you find this information.

 

What you need to know about paying for college

My recent Reuters columns have focused on some of the most common issues families face in trying to pay for college, from getting the most financial aid to how to cope when you haven’t saved enough. Read on, and please share these columns with people you know who might benefit.

Increase economic mobility by busting college myths

One way to improve economic mobility in the United States may be to fix the misconceptions that high-achieving, low-income teenagers often have about college.

Avoid easy-to-make mistakes on your financial aid application

One of the worst mistakes you can make with college financial aid is simply failing to file the all-important Free Application for Federal Student Aid. But there are plenty of other ways to mess up this application.

Last-minute moves to boost financial aid

Financial aid filing season starts Jan. 1. It may be too late to rearrange your finances this year, but here are some ideas for maximizing what you can get in future years. First, though, make sure your hopes are realistic.

What to do if you have not saved enough for college

Soaring college costs and stagnant incomes mean many families will not be able to save enough to pay for a typical undergraduate education. But there are still ways to find a college degree you can afford. The good news is that most people will pay significantly less than the sticker prices.

Busting the myths of haggling for college aid

My daughter learned this little ditty in preschool: “You get what you get, and you don’t get upset.” Parents who are convinced they can haggle their way to a better financial aid package might want to learn it, too.

No need for irrational fears of student loans

The next generation of college students has heard the message loud and clear about the perils of taking on too much student loan debt – so much so that many are unwilling to go into debt at all in order to attend college. The drawback to this wariness is that most of those who do not borrow are unlikely to get four-year degrees.

What will you pay for college? Probably more than you think

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailI recently used the College Board’s “estimated family contribution” calculator to see how much we’ll be expected to pay when our (currently pre-teen) daughter heads off to college.

The answer? Roughly half our annual incomes. Each year.

No colleges actually charge the amount we’d theoretically be expected to pay. So our out-of-pocket costs would be somewhat less. But the exercise drives home how important it is to run these numbers, early and often, if you want a college education for your kids that doesn’t bankrupt you, and them.

Because I know how the formulas work, I was able to tweak some numbers to lower our EFC. Moving more money into retirement accounts and using savings to pay down the mortgage helped a lot with the federal formula, and helped some with the institutional formula (which, unlike the federal, counts home equity). We still wouldn’t get any need-based help from most colleges but could get some breaks if our daughter gets into one of the most-expensive elite schools. (The total cost of the average public college is $20,000 to $25,000; $40,000 for privates and $60,000 for elites.)

If we didn’t have a fat college savings account, we likely would steer our daughter toward public schools or privates willing to offer merit scholarships to reduce the total cost. It’s much better to start a college search knowing what you can afford than to have to tell your kid, dream school acceptance letter in her hand, that you can’t send her there. Or worse, that you will–and then never be able to retire.

For more about how financial aid formulas work, read my Reuters column this week: “A guide to figuring out the real cost of college.”