Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: This could be the biggest blow to your retirement. Also in the news: How one couple ditched their debt, why good credit is essential when remodeling a home, and how to apply for a credit card with no credit.

This Could Be the Biggest Blow to Your Retirement
The battle with healthcare costs.

How I Ditched Debt: ‘It Became Like a Game to Us’
One couple’s story.

Remodeling Your Home? Good Credit Offers a Strong Foundation
The better the credit, the better the offers.

How to Apply for a Credit Card With No Credit Score
Exploring the options.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Credit cards can give you a break on back-to-school purchases. Also in the news: How credit card perks can be your ticket to a cheaper vacation, 3 questions to help grow your retirement savings, and a nonprofit that will give you $1000 if you take personal finance classes.

Credit Cards Can Give You a Break on Back-to-School Purchases
Easing the pain of fall’s big expenses.

Credit Card Perks Can Be Your Ticket to a Cheaper Vacation
Saving on fun.

3 Questions to Help Grow Your Retirement Savings
Give your retirement a boost.

This nonprofit will give you $1,000 if you take a few personal finance classes
Giving Millennials a head start.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 3 questions to help grow your retirement savings. Also in the news: 7 annoying international travel fees you can shrink or skip, why waiting to file bankruptcy can hurt you, and 7 ways to retire without Social Security.

3 Questions to Help Grow Your Retirement Savings
Evaluating your current position.

7 Annoying International Travel Fees You Can Shrink or Skip
Leaving your more money for souvenirs.

Why Waiting to File Bankruptcy Can Hurt You
Making a bad situation worse.

7 Ways to Retire Without Social Security
Creating your own retirement income.

Q&A: Healthcare costs and retirement

Dear Liz: You usually don’t give me such a laugh, but today’s letter was from someone who’s 41 and her husband is 51. They now have $800,000 saved and want to retire early. You told them they might do better leaving the country since it will be so bad for them with health insurance.

My husband was a teacher in Los Angeles, with no Social Security. We have $60,000 in the bank and together we bring in $3,400 a month. We have Kaiser insurance that totals $2,400 a year for both. We have a house, a car, not so much money, but are happy. He’s 82, I’m 79. What planet do you live on? I guess people who have so much money can’t imagine people like us.

Answer: You’re living on Planet Medicare, so perhaps you can’t imagine what people are facing who don’t have access to guaranteed medical coverage.

Currently, those without employer-provided insurance can buy coverage on Affordable Care Act exchanges, but that option may soon be going away. Congress ended the ACA’s individual mandate, which requires most people to have insurance, so costs are expected to rise sharply.

In addition, the future of so-called “guaranteed issue” is in doubt. The ACA currently requires health insurers to accept people with preexisting conditions and limits how much people can be charged, something known as “community rating.” The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced it would not defend those provisions against a lawsuit filed by several states.

When health insurance is unavailable or unaffordable, it doesn’t matter if you have $1 million or more in savings. A hefty retirement fund can disappear in a few months without coverage.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How 1% savings hikes can spice up retired life by $1 million. Also in the news: 7 ways to save at Disneyland, why you shouldn’t let a down payment scare you from buying a home, and how Millennial men and women invest differently.

1% Savings Hikes Can Spice Up Retired Life by $1 Million
The earlier start, the better the boost.

7 Ways to Save at Disneyland — No Magic Required
Keeping your money away from the Mouse.

Don’t Let a Down Payment Scare You Off
Help is available for first-time buyers.

401(k) investing: How Millennial men and women invest differently
It goes back to childhood.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Why new grads shouldn’t snooze and lose on their employer’s 401(k). Also in the news: Ditching debt by working side gigs, how to decide if that life insurance rider is worth it, and how freelancers can save for retirement beyond an IRA.

New Grads, Don’t Snooze and Lose on Your Employer’s 401(k)
One of the biggest steps you’ll take in your new financial life.

How I Ditched Debt: Paying With Cash, Working Side Gigs
One man’s experience paying down his debt.

How to Decide If That Life Insurance Rider Is Worth It
A look at the extra benefits.

How Freelancers Can Save for Retirement Beyond an IRA
Other options to consider.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to resolve finances after a death. Also in the news: 8 ways to prep for financial adulthood, 5 survival strategies for camping on a budget, and how much money you need to save by the time you’re 35.

How to Resolve Finances After a Death
Tying up loose ends.

Class of 2018: 8 Ways to Prep for Financial Adulthood
You’re on your own now.

5 Survival Strategies for Camping on a Budget
Sleeping under the stars for less.

How Much Money You Need to Save by the Time You’re 35
Cause for debate.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 5 ways to rebuild your retirement savings later in life. Also in the news: What you need to know about stock dividend reinvestment plans, the true story of young adults who are totally debt free, and how to boost your retirement fund with a few minor lifestyle changes.

5 Ways to Rebuild Retirement Savings Later in Life
It’s never too late to start saving,

Stock Dividend Reinvestment Plans: What You Should Know
Reinvesting your dividends.

These Young Adults Are Totally Debt-Free — True Story
How they live debt-free.

Boost Your Retirement Fund With These Minor Lifestyle Changes
Small changes that can add up over time.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How much you should contribute to an IRA and how often. Also in the news: Creating a meaningful financial plan, what you should tell your financial advisor, and how to avoid drunk shopping binges.

How Much Should I Contribute to an IRA — and How Often?
Establishing a schedule.

Ask Why, Not What for a Meaningful Financial Plan
Setting the tone.

What You Should Tell Your Financial Advisor
Important information to share.

How to Avoid Drunk Shopping Binges
Valuable advice.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to build your ‘Oh, Crap!’ fund. Also in the news: A strategy that could help new grads retire sooner, United Airlines sets a new pet transport policy, and what happens to your debts when you die.

How to Build Your ‘Oh, Crap!’ Fund
Don’t get caught empty-handed.

New Grads, This Strategy Could Mean Retiring Sooner
Doesn’t that sound nice?

United Airlines Sets New Pet Transport Policy
The policy will ban dozens of dog breeds from being transported in cargo.

What Happens to Your Debts When You Die
They don’t disappear.