Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to bypass ATM fees while you’re on the road. Also in the news: Protecting your digital privacy after you die, 4 smart ways to split bills with friends while traveling abroad, and as the school year begins, beware of hackers.

How to Bypass ATM Fees While You’re on the Road
A little research could save you some bucks.

Who Gets Your Digital Assets: Heirs or Hackers?
Protecting your privacy after you die.

4 Smart Ways to Split Bills With Friends While Traveling Abroad
No need to make it awkward.

As the school year begins, beware of hackers
Hackers are especially targeting college students.

Q&A: Stop judging that overspending friend

Dear Liz: My friend is not good with money. He has always lived above his means. He lived in a fancy apartment, leases a BMW and goes out to eat often. To make matters worse, he lost his job a year ago and had to move in with a mutual friend. He continues to spend money he doesn’t have. I tried to help him with his finances and setting a budget, but he lost interest after one conversation. He’s 41 with no savings and more than $10,000 in credit card debt.

My question: Should I feel guilty about inviting him to things? When he was unemployed, I suggested doing things that don’t cost money, but he never seemed interested. I’m planning a trip for my 40th birthday and I’d like to invite him, but I don’t think he has the self-control to say, “No, I can’t go, I can’t afford it” because it will add $2,000 or more to his debt. How do you deal with someone when you’re more concerned with his financial well-being than he is?

Answer: You let go of the idea that you’re responsible for another person’s behavior.

Financial planners often encounter clients who, despite the planners’ best efforts, sail blissfully on toward economic disaster. And those clients paid for the advice that could save them. You’re not being paid. Your friend may not have even asked for your help. So you can stop offering it.

This will be hard for you. You understand how important it is to avoid credit card debt and save for the future. You may be thinking that if you could come up with the right words, you could persuade him to change his ways. Give up that fantasy, because he won’t change — if he ever does — one second before he’s ready.

There are a number of things you can do to prepare for that moment, if it ever comes. The first is to let go of any judgmental attitudes and feelings you might have about his situation. He may already feel a lot of shame about his circumstances. Even if he doesn’t, he’s unlikely to seek you out if he feels judged and blamed.

The next is to look for other resources that might help him, such as a financial counselor or coach. You can get referrals from the Assn. for Financial Counseling & Planning Education. He may find it easier to work with a professional than a friend.

Finally, resist the urge to offer opinions or observations about his situation. He knows you’re there to help if he ever wants it, so wait to be asked.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Student loan interest rates go up July 1st. Also in the news: Chase rolls out an all-mobile banking app, 5 ways your friendships can blossom on a budget, and how to make living with your parents pay off.

Student Loan Interest Rates Go Up July 1
Prepare for an increase.

Chase Rolls Out All-Mobile Banking App. Is It for You?
All of your banking done on your phone.

5 Ways Your Friendships Can Blossom on a Budget
Don’t let student loans cramp your style.

How to Make Living With Your Parents Pay Off Financially
Start building your savings.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Don’t let your friends derail your finances. Also in the news: Protecting your EIF investments, how to fly with your baby, and why retailers are tracking your returns.

Don’t Let Friends Derail Your Finances
How to stay on track and still have fun.

Are Your ETF Investments at Risk in a Market Sell-Off?
Potecting your investments.

How to Fly With Your Baby
Keeping your sanity in the skies.

Retailers Are Tracking Your Returns
Assigining a “risk score.”

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Why it matters the House voted to squash banking reforms. Also in the news: Your new claims inspector might be a drone, how to build an LGBT-friendly investment portfolio, and how to deal with resentment when your friends make more money than you.

Why It Matters House Voted to Squash Banking Reforms
Consumers will lose.

Meet Your New Claims Inspector: A Drone
Could it speed up the claims process?

How to Build an LGBT-Friendly Investment Portfolio
Diversify.

How to Deal with Resentment When Your Friends Make More Money Than You
A tough spot.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

1381460521Today’s top story: How to stop your budget from leaking money. Also in the news: How to help your kid buy a home, how medical bills could sabotage your retirement, and how to get a friend to finally pay back the money you let them borrow.

How to Plug Leaks in Your Budget
Stopping the slow drip of money.

4 Ways to Help Your Kid Buy a Home
That’s one way to get them to move out.

4 Ways A Large Medical Bill Could Sabotage Your Retirement (And What To Do About It)
How to deal with the unexpected.

3 Reasons You’re Having Trouble Collecting an Insurance Payout
Working through the red tape.

8 Ways to Get Friends to Repay a Personal Loan
Without having to end the friendship.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

power cord and us dollar, concept of expensive energy billToday’s top story: How to keep your energy costs down during summer’s hottest weeks. Also in the news: Why paying rent with a credit card could be a good thing, five signs of a financially needy friend, and lifehacks that’ll help you save money.

6 Ways to Beat the Heat Without Making Your Wallet Sweat
Staying cool and thrifty as the dog days of summer approach.

Paying rent with a credit card can make sense
Being rewarded for paying one of the essentials.

Time to Cut Them Off: 5 Signs You Have a Financially Needy Friend
Knowing when to say when.

Top 10 Mind Hacks To Help You Save More Money
Changing old habits and creating new ones.
12 personal finance moves you should make by 30
Tick-tock.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How the habits of early retirees could lead you to retirement. Also in the news: Things to consider when saving for a mortgage, easing financial worries with smartphone apps, and what to do when your friends are big spenders.

5 Essential Habits of Early Retirees
Retire early by picking up these habits.

Saving for a House: It’s More Than a Down Payment
What to consider when you’re saving for a mortgage.

Face Your Retirement Fears With These Free Financial Tools
Reassurance is just a smartphone app away.

How to Keep but Not Go Broke with Expensive Friends
Balancing your friends and your budget.

5 Ways to Pick the Perfect Time to Sell Your House
As they say, timing is everything.