Is better credit worth exposing your bank data?

America’s credit bureaus haven’t exactly covered themselves in glory when it comes to protecting your private data. So you might well be skeptical about two new credit-enhancing products that require not just credit information but also access to your bank accounts.

In my latest for the Associated Press, why the boost in your score might not be worth the exposure of your banking data.

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Comments

  1. eva lausch says

    Dear Liz,
    Thank you for concidering to respond to my questions:
    I am the only owner of a family home for decades in LA County, CA. I had lived in it for 2 years within the last 5 years but I moved to Europe for family reasons last year. Presently, it is a rental property but I have decided to sell it because it is too difficult to manage it from such a distance. I am a US citizen, getting my SS in Europe therefore I assume that I have to pay Federal Capital Gain Tax after the profit of the sale. Do I have to pay tax to the State of California also that I am not a resident of the State any longer?
    I would like you to clerify the tax rules and laws regarding my situation.
    Thank you very much.