Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Offering AdviceToday’s top story: What veterans need to know about VA mortgages. Also in the news: Generation Y and retirement, the dangers of car title loans, and what the World Series and retirement have in common.

What Veterans Need to Know About Getting a Home Loan
Navigating the world of VA mortgages.

Retirement Tip for Gen Y: Save Now!
Taking control of your financial future.

The Consumer Perils of a Car Title Loan
Easy money can come at a huge price.

7 Things the World Series Can Teach Us About Retirement
Be prepared for extra innings.

The five worst things you can do with your money
Short of just setting it on fire.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Credit card backgroundToday’s top story: Four credit card strategies to get you through the holidays. Also in the news: Bank of America teams up with Khan Academy, how to recover from a setback in retirement planning, and how to make saving money a little less painful.

4 Holiday Credit Card Strategies
Don’t go into holiday shopping without a battle plan.

Tips for Recovering from a Financial Setback in Retirement
Don’t let a momentary setback derail your long term goals.

Khan Academy Teams Up with Bank of America
The duo will offer personal finance lessons.

5 Big Budgeting Mistakes Most People Make
Tracking your actual expenses is absolutely crucial.

5 Ways to Make Saving Money a Little Easier
Simple tips to take the sting out of saving money.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Child and cashWhat to do when your adult kids ask for money, the bad side of credit card cash advances, and how the debt ceiling debacle could hit your wallet.

How to Handle Loan Request From Adult Kids
Carefully maneuvering a potential minefield.

4 Dangers of Credit Card Cash Advances
The fees alone should make you think twice.

Here’s How You’ll Make and Save Money in the Future
Are Bitcoins and crowdfunding the wave of the future?

You Can Raise Secure Kids Even in This Financially Insecure Time
Preparing your kids for what lies ahead.

4 Ways a Debt Ceiling Crisis Could Affect You
How the debate in Washington could have a serious affect on your personal finances.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

CollegeWhy Generation X needs to accept the inevitable, coping with a layoff, and how the key to financial prosperity could be inside a funeral home.

Survey: Gen X seriously short on life insurance
Note to Gen Xers: You’re not getting any younger.

3 Ways You May Be Throwing Money Away Without Realizing It
Hands off that retirement account.

What to Do if You Just Got Laid Off
What you need to do once the panic subsides.

4 Tips to Help 30-Somethings Save for a Rainy Day
In every life, a little rain must fall.

10 Unusual Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well
What cruise ship entertainers, hot dog vendors, and morticians have in common.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

RelationshipThe craziness of prescription drug pricing, how financial stress can tax your mind, and why that friend you play Candy Crush with could be ruining your credit score.

$37 to $162: The Strange World of Birth Control Pill Prices
How to shop wisely for your prescriptions.

5 Subscriptions You Could Be Paying Less For
Surprising ways to save money on the services you use every day.

Financial stress may hit your brain and wallet
Worrying about bills could cost you a few IQ points.

Facebook friends could change your credit score
It might be time for a friend list culling.

4 Credit Moves to Finish Your Summer on a High Note
Ending the summer with a financial bang.

How to make saving money easier

Dear Liz: What’s the easiest way to save money? I have the hardest time. I want to save, but I feel that I don’t make enough to start saving.

Answer: The easiest way to save is to do it without thinking about it.

That usually means setting up automatic transfers either from your paycheck or from your checking account. If you have to think about putting aside money, you’ll probably think of other things to do with that cash. If it’s done automatically, you may be surprised at how fast the money piles up.

The second part of this equation is to leave your savings alone. If you’re constantly dipping into savings to cover regular expenses, you won’t get ahead.

People manage to save even on small incomes because they make it a priority. They “pay themselves first,” putting aside money for savings before any other bills are paid. Start with small, regular transfers and increase them as you can.

Now available: My new book!

Do you have questions about money? Here’s a secret: we all do, and sometimes finding the right answers can be tough. My new book, “There Are No Dumb Questions About Money,” can make it easier for you to figure out your financial world.

I’ve taken your toughest questions about money and answered them in a clear, easy-to-read format. This book can help you manage your spending, improve your credit and find the best way to pay off debt. It can help you make the right choices when you’re investing, paying for your children’s education and prioritizing your financial goals. I’ve also tackled the difficult, emotional side of money: how to get on the same page with your partner, cope with spendthrift children (or parents!) and talk about end-of-life issues that can be so difficult to discuss. (And if you think your family is dysfunctional about money, read Chapter 5…you’ll either find answers to your problems, or be grateful that your situation isn’t as bad as some of the ones described there!)

Interested? You can buy this ebook on iTunes or on Amazon.