Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

2Today’s top story: 4 steps to managing your parents’ bank accounts. Also in the news: How banks boost overdrafts by counting big debits first, how to determine whether to pay down debt or save for retirement, and mistakes to avoid when choosing a financial advisor.

4 Steps to Managing Your Parents’ Bank Accounts
Taking the reins.

Many Banks Boost Overdrafts by Counting Big Debits First, Report Says
Putting transcations in a certain order can guarantee overdraft fees.

This Calculator Will Tell You Whether to Pay Down Debt or Save for Retirement
Which should you choose?

3 Mistakes to Avoid When Picking a Financial Advisor
Selecting the right one for your needs.

How 3 People Changed Their Financial Lives

Lauren Greutman’s moment of truth dawned when she sneaked $600 worth of clothes into her closet. She didn’t want her husband to see what she had bought — or to know that they were $40,000 in debt.

J.D. Roth hit bottom after buying a home he thought he could afford

Zina Kumok’s epiphany came when she saw her student loan payment eating 20 percent of her paychecks.

The catalysts were different, but the reactions of these three people in different parts of the U.S. were the same. Years of incurring debt made them realize that they couldn’t continue to spend like before.

In my latest for the Associated Press, learn how these three people changed their financial lives.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

twrmn81mopj80nvlk4zqToday’s top story: Manage your debt for a smoother divorce. Also in the news: Giving your child the gift of stocks, how to donate credit card points and miles to charity, and six ways to make the most of your holiday bonus.

Manage Your Debt for a Smoother Divorce
Making a difficult situation a bit easier.

Give Your Child the Gift of Stocks
The gift that keeps on giving.

How to Donate Credit Card Points, Miles or Cash Back to Charity
Put those forgotten miles to good use.

6 Ways to Make the Most of Your Holiday Bonus
Stretching it out.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Pile of Credit CardsToday’s top story: How to choose your second credit card. Also in the news: How home insurance can cover your holiday disasters, how Affordable Care Act plans could change in 2017, and how to calculate how long it’ll take you to get out of the debt.

How to Choose Your Second Credit Card
Finding a card that compliments your spending habits.

No Need to Pout: Home Insurance Can Cover That Holiday Disaster
Saving you from becoming The Grinch.

How Affordable Care Act Marketplace Insurance Plans Will Change in 2017
A new administration could bring big changes.

How Long It Will Take to Get Out of Debt, Depending on Your Monthly Payment
Calculating your escape date.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

stack-of-billsToday’s top story: Why minimum payments on credit cards are designed to keep you in debt. Also in the news: Retirement planning rules Millennials can break, how to choose the right health insurance plan “metal tier,” and why it’s so hard to stick to a budget.

Credit Card Minimums: Perfectly Calibrated to Keep You in Debt
The card companies aren’t on your side.

4 Retirement Planning Rules Millennials Can Break
Or at least bend.

Choosing the Right Health Insurance Plan ‘Metal Tier’
Sadly, no rose gold.

Why Is It So Hard to Stick to a Budget?
Answering the age-old question.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

bills-smallToday’s top story: Why you should validate a debt before paying a collector. Also in the news: How to choose a Medicare Advantage plan, how and when to report tips for tax purposes, and how people survived their financial nightmares.

Validate Debt Before Paying a Collector, Avoid Costly Errors
Make sure the debt is legitimate.

How to Choose a Medicare Advantage Plan
Open enrollment continues through December 7th.

How and When to Report Tips for Tax Purposes
Deciphering the rules on tips.

Scary Money Moments: How 5 People Survived Their Financial Nightmares
Just in time for Halloween!

Borrowing your way out of debt

how-are-debt-consolidation-loans-handledMany people who take out loans to pay off credit cards and other obligations wind up worse off, with more debt and more stress than before they applied. Some people, though, successfully use debt consolidation loans to turn a bad financial situation around.

In my latest for the Associated Press, a look at debt consolidation loans and how to keep yourself out of the debt trap.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

o-CREDIT-REPORT-facebookToday’s top story: What you need to qualify for a credit card when you have bad credit. Also in the news: How to escape low-yield savings options, how one couple paid off $74,000 of debt in two years, and the building blocks that lead to smart money decisions.

What You Need to Qualify for a Credit Card for Bad Credit
Don’t fall for high fee offers.

How to Escape Low-Yield Bank Savings Options
How to get better returns without increased risk.

How One Couple Paid Off $74,000 in 2 Years
The success of the snowball method.

These Are the ‘Building Blocks’ That Lead to Smart Money Decisions
Teaching kids sound money practices.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: Key financial considerations when you live alone. Also in the news: Managing your money while you’re separated from your spouse, determining how much life insurance you really need, and a change in thinking that will help get you out of debt.

Key Financial Considerations When You Live Alone
Important considerations for your life.

3 Tips for Managing Your Money While Separated From Your Spouse
Keeping your finances in order during difficult times.

How Much Life Insurance Do You Really Need?
Keeping yourself protected.

The Shift in Mindset That Will Help You Get Out of Debt
A change in thinking.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to save for college without sacrificing retirement. Also in the news: Recovering from a poor credit history, 3 ways to pay off a debt in collections, and the best savings strategies for your personality type.

How to Save for College Without Sacrificing Retirement
It’s possible to do both.

Poor Credit History? There Are Ways to Recover
Making a comeback.

3 Ways to Pay Off a Debt in Collections
Getting debt collectors off your back.

Here Are the Best Savings Strategies for Your Personality Type
Are you the gambling type? Or a goal-setter?