Q&A: Revisiting a Medicare penalty

Dear Liz: As a county employee of 44 years, I was offered the option to contribute to Social Security in the mid-1970s. It was not mandatory and I declined. When I retired in 2004, I did not apply for Medicare as I wrongly assumed that I would not qualify. I have since learned that I can apply for Medicare but that I would have to pay $499 per month as a late enrollment penalty on top of the monthly premium. Do you know any way that I can get a portion of the late penalty waived?

Answer:
As your situation shows, not getting sound advice about Medicare can be expensive. Failing to sign up for Part B coverage, which pays for doctor’s visits, can incur penalties of 10% for each 12 months you were eligible but didn’t enroll. The penalties are typically permanent.

There is an appeals process, but your chances of success may not be great unless you can prove that you delayed enrollment because of bad advice you got from a government representative. Medicare has more information on its site.

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