Q&A: Giving away your relief funds

Dear Liz: My wife and I are retired. We are comfortable financially, with a generous pension, maximum Social Security benefits due to start in a few months, and three years’ worth of ready cash in the bank. We don’t anticipate touching our investments until mandatory distributions from our IRAs kick in. Now we’re apparently going to get $2,400 tax-free as part of the coronavirus stimulus package. We don’t need the money, nor do we particularly want it. We’d welcome your thoughts on how we can give it away to generate the greatest good, on the individual and societal levels. Where is the “multiplier” effect the greatest?

Answer: Thank you for thinking of others. Donating money to a food bank is always a good choice. These charities often have deals with food suppliers that allow them to create far more meals using donated money than they would be able to produce with donated food. Cash also allows food banks to offer perishables. In some cases, food banks work directly with farmers to supply fruits and vegetables that are too imperfect to sell, which reduces food waste.

One option is to give through Feeding America, which represents a network of 200 food banks nationwide that feed more than 40 million people. Meals on Wheels is another option that helps 5,000 community-based programs.

There are many other ways, of course, to help people hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic. Before you give to a charity, check it out at one of the watchdog organizations such as Charity Navigator or CharityWatch. You’ll want to make sure the bulk of your money supports the cause, rather than fundraising efforts or overhead.

You also can use the checks to directly help people or businesses in need. Buying gift cards from local restaurants and small businesses offers a potential two-for-one benefit: You can give the cards to people who need the assistance while you help keep the businesses afloat. Or you can subscribe to newspapers and public radio stations that are working hard to bring you accurate and timely information about staying safe in the pandemic.

Related Posts

Comments

  1. Barbara Larrain says

    Is the stimulus money really tax free? Isn’t it really just an advance on one tax refund after filing 2020 taxes in April 2021.