Monday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: What you need to ask before hiring a financial adviser. Also in the news: How often you should check your credit report, the benefits of tracking all of your expenses, and retirement savings mythbusting.

20 Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Financial Adviser
Making sure you hire the right one.

How Often Should I Check My Credit?
Finding the happy medium between ignoring it and obsessing over it.

Do You Track All of Your Expenses?
How tracking all of your expenses could help you stick to a budget.

10 Retirement Savings Myths That Won’t Go Away
Time for some mythbusting!

Q&A: Max contributions to 401(k)s

Dear Liz: I understand that anybody with a 401(k) can contribute up to $18,000. Does the amount you can contribute depend on your salary? Say you make $45,000. Therefore I would assume you could put in the full $18,000, or 40% of your salary. Am I wrong?

Answer: The maximum the IRS allows someone under 50 to contribute to a 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is $18,000 in 2015. The additional “catch up” contribution limit for people 50 and older is $6,000.

The plans themselves, though, may impose lower limits. Even if the plan doesn’t cap contributions, your contributions may be limited if you’re considered a “highly compensated employee.” Last year, highly compensated employees were those who earned more than $115,000 or owned more than 5% of the business. If lower-earning employees don’t contribute enough to the plan, higher earners may not be able to put in as much as they’d like.

Q&A: Capital gains taxes

Dear Liz: My wife owns a house that was separate property before our marriage. She has since fallen ill and needs round-the-clock care. I am selling the house to support this and will net about $250,000 at close. Will we have to pay capital gains taxes, or can I claim a one-time exemption, based upon this not being community property?

Answer: If your wife lived in the property as her principal residence for at least two of the five years prior to the sale, the profit would qualify for the capital gains exemption of up to $250,000 per owner.

People who have to sell their principal homes before they meet the two-year residency requirement may qualify for a partial exclusion if the sale was triggered by special circumstances such as a change in health or employment or “unforeseen circumstances.” You’ll want to talk to a tax pro about whether your wife’s situation qualifies.

Even if the gain is taxable, she may not owe tax on the entire amount netted from the sale. When figuring home sale profit, her basis in the home — essentially, what she paid for it, plus any qualifying improvements — is subtracted from what she nets from the sale.

There’s another way to avoid paying taxes on home sale gains, and that’s to hold on to the property until your wife’s death. At that point, the home would get a “step up” in tax basis to the current market value. An inheritor who sold the home at that market value wouldn’t owe any tax, said Mark Luscombe, principal analyst for Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting U.S.

Q&A: Postponing Social Security

Dear Liz: My question is on when to take Social Security. My financial advisor recommends that I file for my benefit at age 66 but suspend the application so my benefit can continue to grow until it maxes out at age 70. At 66, I would receive $2,614 per month. At age 70 I would receive $3,451 per month. In those 48 months I would have received $125,472. I calculate that it would take me 12.49 years to make up the difference of $837 a month. So why should I postpone until age 70? What am I missing?

Answer: There’s a big difference between postponing Social Security until your full retirement age of 66 and postponing again until age 70.

Postponing until full retirement age is pretty much a slam-dunk, if you can afford to do so. That’s because most people will live beyond the break-even point, which is typically somewhere between ages 77 and 78.

The break-even point for postponing until age 70 is between age 83 and 84, which is cutting it closer in terms of average life expectancy. A man who reaches age 65 is expected to live on average until age 84. Women reaching 65 are expected to live until 86.

But focusing just on break-even points ignores other, more important factors.

One is that waiting offers an 8% annual return between age 66 and 70. No other investment offers a built-in, guaranteed return that high.

Another has to do with survivors. If your spouse earned less than you, she would end up depending on your check alone should you die first. (Survivors get the larger of their own benefit or their spouse’s, but not both.) The larger the check, the better off she’ll be.

You can think of Social Security as a kind of longevity insurance that protects you against poverty in old age. The longer you or your spouse live, the greater the chance that your assets will be exhausted and that one or both of you will end up depending on Social Security for the greatest part of your income.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: What happens to your credit after you die? Also in the news: Secrets to buying long-term-care insurance, how to calculate your personal savings rate, and five steps to planning a secure retirement.

What Happens to Your Credit When You Die?
Who, if anyone, is responsible for paying it off?

4 Secrets to Buying Long-Term-Care Insurance
How to find the best policy.

Calculate Your Overall Savings Rate to Measure Your Financial Health
Discovering your personal savings rate.

5 steps to planning a secure retirement
What you need to do in order to retire peacefully.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

money-down-the-drainToday’s top story: Common money mistakes you need to avoid. Also in the news: When should you get professional help for education expenses, what you need to do in order to retire in the next five years, and five of the craziest credit card perks.

11 Common Money Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make
Watch out.

When To Pay For Education-Related Financial Help
Knowing when to call in the experts.

If You Want to Retire in the Next Five Years, Do These 9 Things Now
Time to get busy.

5 Crazy Credit Card Perks
Virtual flight simulator!

Why “Get scholarships!” is bad advice

Student-LoansWe had a great Twitter chat today about preparing financially for college, hosted by Experian. (You’ll find the tweets using #creditchat.)

I was distressed, though, that many believe people should look for scholarships as a way to reduce college costs. That’s not how it usually works.

If you have financial need, colleges typically deduct the amount of so-called “outside” scholarships from the free aid such as grants and their own scholarships that they otherwise would give you. Schools don’t have to reduce the loan portion of your package unless your outside scholarships exceed the grants and other free aid they were planning to bestow.

They’re not just being mean. It’s what federal financial aid rules require, according to FinAid. If you don’t have financial need, outside scholarships could reduce the merit aid a school would otherwise give you.

Does that mean you shouldn’t search and compete for outside scholarships? No. But it’s certainly not a reliable solution to the college affordability problem.

A better approach for students and families is to look for generous schools. Colleges themselves are the greatest source of scholarships, but most don’t meet 100 percent of their students’ financial need. Some meet 70 percent or less. If you want a better deal, look for schools that consistently meet 90 percent or more of their students’ need. College Board and College Data are among the sites that can help you find this information.

 

4 hacks to boost your credit scores–fast

FICO-score-calculation-300x281Losing points from your credit scores is all too easy — and getting them back is hard. But if you know how credit scoring works, you can hack the process to rehabilitate your numbers faster. Here are four effective strategies to do just that.

(This article first appeared as “4 hacks to boost your credit score quickly” on DailyWorth.)

Pay your credit cards twice each month. Even if you pay your balances in full every month, using up too much of your available credit at any given time can hurt your scores. You can lessen the damage by making two payments each month: one just before the card’s statement closing date and another just before the due date. The first payment typically reduces the balance that’s reported to the credit bureaus, while the second assures that you don’t wind up paying interest or incurring a late fee on any remaining charges.

Dispute old, small collection accounts. The latest version of the leading credit scoring formula, the FICO 8, already ignores collection accounts where the original balance was less than $100. Not all lenders use this formula, though, so you might see an increase in your scores if you dispute that $50 parking ticket you forgot to pay or the $75 medical bill that slipped through the cracks of your insurer’s reimbursement system. The collection agencies that report these minor bills may not bother to respond to the credit bureaus’ investigation attempts, especially as the accounts approach the seven-year mark, where they’d have to be dropped from your credit reports anyway.

Get added as an authorized user on someone else’s account. Another person’s good history with their credit card could be imported into your credit bureau files to help burnish your scores. Plus, the other person doesn’t have to give you access to the account — you can be an authorized user in name only. Some card companies will allow this importing only if you’re a relative, so check in advance.

Pay off your credit cards with a personal loan. Paying down your credit card balances widens the gap between your available credit and the amount you’re using, which is great for your scores. If you can’t pay your cards off immediately, consider moving the balances to a three-year personal loan. Balances on such installment loans don’t affect your scores as strongly as balances on credit cards. Check with your local credit union first, since these member-owned financial institutions tend to offer the best rates and terms on personal loans.

For more of my DailyWorth columns, visit https://www.dailyworth.com/tags/liz-weston.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to cut your monthly bills. Also in the news: College savings mistakes, how to survive a late start in saving for retirement, and what everyone needs to know about credit scores.

6 ways to cut your monthly bills
Every little bit helps.

The Biggest Mistakes People Make Saving For College
It’s all about tools.

Starting Your Retirement Savings Late Doesn’t Mean You’re Screwed
There’s still time.

10 things everyone should know about credit scores
Deciphering the mysteries.

How to Develop a Foolproof Plan to Pay Off Debt
Create your escape plan.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

FICO-score-calculation-300x281Today’s top story: Unraveling the mysteries of the FICO score. Also in the news: What you shouldn’t buy with your tax refund, teaching your kids good money habits, and 11 common money mistakes to avoid.

How Many FICO Scores Are There?
More than you’d think.

5 things not to buy with your tax refund
Put down that solid gold Apple watch.

How to Use Allowances to Teach Kids About Money
Instilling good money habits early.

Don’t Make These 11 Common Money Mistakes
Avoid getting caught in a spending trap.

5 Vital Questions To Ask Before Retirement
Remember, this isn’t a permanent vacation.