Q&A: She counted on pandemic rent relief but didn’t qualify. Now what?

Dear Liz: I have a friend in dire financial straits. She has borrowed from her retirement, spends too much and didn’t pay her rent thinking she would get pandemic relief, but she makes too much to qualify for emergency rental assistance. She has mental health issues, which are being addressed by a therapist, but I would love to offer her financial counseling services as well. She is in her late 50s and desperately depressed over this. It’s hard to stand by when the rest of our friend group is doing well, and we’re not sure how to direct her. I would possibly be willing to pay for a financial counselor but will not “loan” her money because that is a losing proposition.

Answer: Congress approved nearly $50 billion in emergency rental assistance to help pay back rent and utilities for low-income people impacted by the pandemic. The key phrase is “low income.” The help isn’t available for people who earn more than 80% of the area’s median income, and many programs are limiting the aid to those with incomes below 50% of the median. The aid is being distributed through more than 100 state and local agencies, and more programs are on the way. The National Low Income Housing Coalition is keeping a list.

Currently, landlords are mostly prohibited from evicting non-paying tenants, but eviction moratoriums will someday end. Your friend could find herself not just turned out of her home but unable to rent decent housing, since many landlords won’t consider anyone who’s been evicted. Avoiding that fate needs to be a top priority for her.

Nonprofit credit counseling agencies, such as those affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, offer a variety of low-cost or free services that may help your friend, including housing counseling, budgeting help and debt management plans. She also should consider discussing her situation with a bankruptcy attorney.

Her depression may make it difficult for her to take action, so you could help her make the appointment and even offer to accompany her. Ultimately, of course, it will be up to her to make the necessary changes, but supportive, nonjudgmental friends could be an enormous help.

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