Q&A: Identity theft fears? Get a credit report, credit freeze

Dear Liz: I divorced 32 years ago. Recently, I received calls from a collection agency about a debt that has not been paid. I discovered that my ex used my phone number as one of his contact numbers. My number is supposed to be unlisted and unpublished, but he found it online. I have stopped receiving calls from the agency, but how do I stop this from happening again?

Answer: Please check your credit reports to make sure your ex didn’t swipe even more sensitive digits: namely, your Social Security number. If his credit is bad, he may be tempted to pretend to be you in order to get credit cards, loans or other accounts. That’s identity theft, and there are steps you should take now to protect yourself.

You can access your credit reports for free at AnnualCreditReport.com. (If you’re asked for a credit card number, you’re on the wrong site.) Look for any accounts that aren’t yours and consider freezing your credit reports at each of the bureaus. Credit freezes prevent someone from opening new accounts in your name. You can thaw the freeze whenever you need credit, also for free.

You can’t prevent someone from adding your phone number to their credit applications, but under federal law you can tell a collection agency to stop contacting you, and it must comply. Make the request in writing.

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