Q&A: A young widow seeks help with Social Security survivor benefits

Dear Liz: My husband died at 30, making me a widow at 29. I did receive Social Security survivor benefits for our underage children, but what, if anything, am I entitled to as his wife? At the time of his death, we were living separately, although we were still legally married.

Answer: The earliest a widow or widower can get survivor benefits is typically age 60, unless they are disabled, when survivor benefits can begin at 50. Starting benefits before their own full retirement age of 66 to 67 means accepting a reduced payment, but widows and widowers have the option of switching to their own retirement benefit later. (Retirement benefits begin at a reduced amount at age 62 and reach their maximum at age 70.)

Like other Social Security benefits, survivor benefits also are subject to the earnings test if you start them before full retirement age. The earnings test reduces your benefit by $1 for every $2 you earn over a certain amount, which in 2020 is $18,240.

You mentioned receiving survivor benefits for your children, but you probably also received benefits then. A spouse caring for the children of a deceased worker is entitled to survivor benefits until the youngest of those children turns 16. (A child’s survivor benefits can continue until age 18, or 19 if the child is still in high school, or indefinitely if they are disabled and the disability began before age 22.) Each family member can receive up to 75% of the deceased worker’s benefit, but there’s a maximum any household can receive based on one worker’s earnings record. The limit varies but is generally 150% to 180% of the worker’s benefit.

If you had been divorced rather than separated when he died, you would still have been entitled to survivor benefits as the caretaker of underage children, no matter how long the marriage lasted. You would only receive regular survivor benefits at 60, however, if your marriage had lasted at least 10 years.

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