Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to help your partner’s credit without harming your own. Also in the news: Why Millennials can count on Social Security after all, 3 smart ways to supercharge your travel rewards, and the worst financial mistake a grandparent can make.

Help Your Partner’s Credit — Without Harming Your Own
Start by talking about it.

Millennials Can Count on Social Security After All
Good news!

3 Smart Ways to Supercharge Your Travel Rewards
Spend strategically.

This is the worst financial mistake a grandparent can make
No matter how well-intentioned.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How grads can get another shot at student loan forgiveness. Also in the news: Spring cleaning your credit cards, how to sidestep 3 unethical financial advisor tactics, and how to handle loaning money to your parents.

How Grads Can Get Another Shot at Student Loan Forgiveness
This could be your last chance.

This Spring, Clear Mediocre Credit Cards Out of Your Wallet
Get rid of the credit clutter.

How to Sidestep 3 Unethical Financial Advisor Tactics
Protect yourself.

How to Handle Loaning Money to Your Parents
Role reversal.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Equifax extends credit freeze deadline. Also in the news: Why single parents are turning to online colleges, how credit card rewards can take the sting out of a starter budget, and strapped families hope President Trump will tackle student loans in tonight’s State of the Union address.

How to Freeze Your Credit With Equifax
Extended deadlines.

For Some Single Parents, Online College Holds the Key

Credit Card Rewards Take the Sting Out of a Starter Budget

Strapped families hope Trump’s speech will tackle student loans
The State of the Union speech is tonight.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 7 questions to ask before you hire a tax professional. Also in the news: The security of your hotel’s mobile room key, side hustles you can start with no money, and how to pay off student debt while still saving and investing.

7 Questions to Ask Before You Hire a Tax Professional
Asking the important questions.

How Secure Is Your Hotel’s Mobile Room Key?
Risking safety for convenience?

Side Hustles You Can Start With No Money
No investment necessary.

How to Pay Off Student Loan Debt While Still Saving and Investing
Paying for the past, planning for the future.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to make a money resolution that succeeds. Also in the news: Cashless kids’ allowances, 3 things to know about Spotify’s IPO, and why you should prioritize your job’s 401(k) benefits over offers of student loan help.

Ask Brianna: How Do I Make a Money Resolution That Succeeds?
How to stick with it.

For Kids’ Allowance, No Cash Required
Preparing your kids for life in the digital world.

Spotify’s Oddball IPO: 3 Things to Know Before You Buy
The streaming service is going public.

Prioritize Your Job’s 401(k) Benefits Over Their Offers of Student Loan Help
Taking the long view.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Learn the truth about overdraft fees and save money. Also in the news: Beware the Dead Cat Bounce (and other stock market jargon), students breathe easy on the tax bill, and what will be more (and less) expensive in 2018.

Learn the Truth About Overdraft Fees — and Save Money
Looking at alternatives.

Beware the Dead Cat Bounce (and Other Stock Market Jargon)
Learning the language of Wall Street.

Students Breathe Easy on Tax Bill but Other Battles Loom
A momentary reprieve.

What will be more (and less) expensive in 2018
Travel prices are going up.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 6 ways the tax plan could change homeownership. Also in the news: What the Fed rate hike means for student loans, what it means for your CDs, and how Donald Trump is shrinking your paycheck.

6 Ways Tax Plan Could Change Homeownership
Analyzing the impact.

Fed Rate Hike: What It Means for Student Loans
Checking your rates.

December 2017 Fed Rate Hike: What It Means for Your CDs
Impacting your savings.

Here’s How Donald Trump Is Shrinking Your Paycheck
Looking at the nuances of the tax plan.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: What doesn’t affect your credit score. Also in the news: A crash course for first-time Black Friday shoppers, how far your money will stretch on Black Friday, and how to pick a college that won’t break the bank.

What Doesn’t Affect Your Credit Score
Focusing on the important factors.

A Crash Course for First-Time Black Friday Shoppers
Tips for rookies.

See How Far Your Money Will Stretch on Black Friday
Getting the most for your money.

How to pick a college that won’t break the bank
Avoiding years of student loan repayment.

Q&A: Should grandma sue over the student loan she co-signed?

Dear Liz: You recently answered a letter from a grandmother who co-signed a student loan for a granddaughter who isn’t paying the debt. Although you did not suggest it, a very viable option would be for the grandmother to contact an attorney and sue her daughter and her granddaughter for the debt owed.

It doesn’t appear that they care for the grandmother anyway, so why feel bad about holding their feet to the fire? The grandmother may not have a legal leg to stand on with the daughter, but surely the granddaughter received the benefit of the loan and should ante up.

Answer: Suing a family member is a pretty drastic step that many people are reluctant to consider. If the grandmother is in fact “judgment proof” — if creditors who sue her wouldn’t be allowed to garnish her income or seize her property — then the lender might start focusing its collection actions on the granddaughter. The grandmother wouldn’t have to go to the expense of suing the young woman or trying to collect on a judgment.

Either way, the bankruptcy attorney I suggested she consult to help determine if she’s judgment proof also would be able to advise her about filing such a lawsuit.

To reiterate, student loans typically can’t be discharged in bankruptcy, but bankruptcy attorneys understand the credit laws of their states and can help people assess how vulnerable they are to lawsuits and other collection actions.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The scariest thing to find on your credit report. Also in the news: How to spend your day when you’re unemployed, advocates praise student loan scam crackdown, and how to get your student loans back on course.

The Scariest Thing to Find on Your Credit Reports
Beware of surprises.

How to Spend Your Day When You’re Unemployed
Getting off the couch is a good start.

Advocates Praise Student Loan Scam Crackdown, Demand More
The tip of the iceberg.

Ask Brianna: How do I get my student loans back on course?
Course correction.