Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to save for 2017 and 2057 at the same time. Also in the news: What new prepaid debit card rules mean for you, life insurance strategies for families with special needs children, and the high cost of using an ATM.

How to Save for 2017 and 2057 at the Same Time
Saving for the immediate and long-term future.

What the New Prepaid Card Rules Mean for You
Easier to understand terms and more security.

A Life Insurance Strategy for Families With Special-Needs Children
Making sure your loved ones are taken care of.

You won’t believe average cost of using an ATM
The crazy cost of accessing your own money.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

common-retirement-mistakesToday’s top story: How to tell if your 401(k) is a dud. Also in the news: How to find unclaimed property, great tax deductions for retirees, and how to sneak more savings into your budget.

How To Tell If Your 401(k) Is a Dud
Reviving your retirement fund.

Are You Owed Money From a Forgotten Bank Account?
You could have unclaimed property.

5 Great Tax Deductions and Credits for Retirees
Maximizing your deductions.

How to Sneak More Savings Into Your Budget
You won’t even notice it’s gone.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: Key financial considerations when you live alone. Also in the news: Managing your money while you’re separated from your spouse, determining how much life insurance you really need, and a change in thinking that will help get you out of debt.

Key Financial Considerations When You Live Alone
Important considerations for your life.

3 Tips for Managing Your Money While Separated From Your Spouse
Keeping your finances in order during difficult times.

How Much Life Insurance Do You Really Need?
Keeping yourself protected.

The Shift in Mindset That Will Help You Get Out of Debt
A change in thinking.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to save for college without sacrificing retirement. Also in the news: Recovering from a poor credit history, 3 ways to pay off a debt in collections, and the best savings strategies for your personality type.

How to Save for College Without Sacrificing Retirement
It’s possible to do both.

Poor Credit History? There Are Ways to Recover
Making a comeback.

3 Ways to Pay Off a Debt in Collections
Getting debt collectors off your back.

Here Are the Best Savings Strategies for Your Personality Type
Are you the gambling type? Or a goal-setter?

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

dog holding a purse with money in its mouth. isolated on white bToday’s top story: How to save without using your savings account. Also in the news: Why you should have a separate bank account for your side jobs, the bad side to inactive credit, and how much it really costs to own a dog.

4 Ways to Save Without Your Savings Account
Under the mattress doesn’t count.

Why You Need a Separate Bank Account for Your Side Job
Keeping your money straight.

Inactive Credit: How Long It Takes, and How to Use a Credit Card to Prevent It
Not using credit can actually hurt your score.

This is how much it really costs to own a dog per year
Man’s best friend can get pretty pricey.

The recipe for building wealth hasn’t changed

Building wealth has gotten harder for most people in recent years. But the habits that can make you rich haven’t changed.

It boils down to this: putting aside money, regularly and consistently, that can be invested for your future. You have to leave that money alone to grow, which means you also need an emergency fund. And you must be careful with debt, because the wrong kinds can erode your wealth rather than build it.

It’s a simple formula but one that’s become increasingly hard to implement as incomes stagnate and prices rise. A shocking number of American households — nearly half, by the Federal Reserve’s last count — don’t have enough savings to cover an unexpected $400 expense. Our inability to save has contributed to a 21 percent decline in household median net worth between 1998, the year median incomes peaked in America, and 2013, the last year for which Fed stats are available.

Hardest-hit are households in the lower middle class, which in 2013 meant incomes from $23,300 to $40,499. Their net worth fell by half.

In my latest for the Associated Press, how to use the habits of wealthy people to build for your future.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: What Hillary Clinton’s college affordability plan could mean for you. Also in the news: How to enjoy your summer vacation without going broke, what seniors want you to know about managing money, and how to save for retirement without a full-time job.

What Clinton’s College Affordability Plan Could Mean for You
Is this a gamechanger?

Enjoy Your Summer Vacation — Without Maxing out Your Credit Cards
It doesn’t have to cost a fortune.

10 Things Seniors Want You to Know About Managing Money
Speaking from experience.

5 ways to save for retirement without a full-time job or 401k
Every bit helps.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

150309_BlogToday’s top story: Why Americans should care about Brexit. Also in the news: Other insurance benefits you can count on, why millions of Americans prefer their credit card statements on paper, and simple budgeting strategies that can bring real results.

3 Reasons Why Americans Should Care About ‘Brexit’
It’s not just Europe’s problem.

The Other ‘Insurance’ Benefits You Can Count On
Insurance outside the box.

Millions of Americans prefer their credit card statements on paper
Old habits die hard.

Five Simple Budgeting Strategies That Can Bring Real Results
Simple savings can bring in big bucks.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

shutterstock_38185810-2Today’s top story: Why university checking accounts don’t make the grade. Also in the news: Financial steps to take in your 30s, personal finance calculators, and the savings habits of the super rich.

University Checking Accounts Don’t Make the Grade
High overdraft fees are a dealbreaker.

7 Important Financial Steps to Take in Your 30s
Time to start thinking past tomorrow.

15 Personal Finance Calculators Everyone Should Use
It’s all about the numbers.

The Super Rich Start Saving Super Early
Learning from the masters.

Don’t Give Up on Social Security — Count On It

Blog-Crop71Everything you think you know about Social Security is probably wrong.

The system isn’t “running out of money.” It’s not going bankrupt. And the chances are quite good that millennials will receive benefits from Social Security — although half of them don’t believe it, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center study.

Not understanding how Social Security works can be hugely detrimental to your future retirement. In my latest for NerdWallet, why it’s important to act instead of panicking.