Monday’s need-to-know money news

wall_street_zombie_moneyToday’s top story: Frightening types of 401(k) fees. Also in the news: It’s time for open enrollment, how to avoid bringing zombie debt back from the grave, and the staggering amount of money behind all things pumpkin.

3 Frightening Types of 401(k) Fees
The dark side of retirement funds.

Nov. 1 Means It’s Time for Health Insurance Open Enrollment
Time to purchase health insurance.

1 wrong move can bring ‘zombie’ debt back from the grave

If you thought the pumpkin spice craze was a bit much, look at this number
Pumpkins are a smashing success.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

common-retirement-mistakesToday’s top story: Why Halloween is the number 1 day for free candy and property damage. Also in the news: Retirement planning, reverse mortgages, and jobs to consider if you’re looking for a pay increase.

Halloween Is No. 1 Day for Free Candy — and Property Crime
Protecting yourself while still having fun.

Your retirement won’t be a dream if you don’t get real
Time to quit dreaming and start working.

How to tell if a reverse mortgage is right for you
What works best with your existing financnes.

Want a big pay raise? Consider these 13 jobs
Time for a career change?

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to save for college without sacrificing retirement. Also in the news: Recovering from a poor credit history, 3 ways to pay off a debt in collections, and the best savings strategies for your personality type.

How to Save for College Without Sacrificing Retirement
It’s possible to do both.

Poor Credit History? There Are Ways to Recover
Making a comeback.

3 Ways to Pay Off a Debt in Collections
Getting debt collectors off your back.

Here Are the Best Savings Strategies for Your Personality Type
Are you the gambling type? Or a goal-setter?

A Hail Mary Retirement Plan for Those With Nothing Saved

no-retirement-savings1You’re rounding the corner toward retirement age with not nearly enough set aside.

We tell young people to start saving for retirement from their first job and not to quit, because even small sums can grow staggeringly large with enough decades of compound returns. But maybe you bumped along from paycheck to paycheck, never saving much. Or maybe you tried to save but got slammed with unexpected setbacks like a late-in-life job loss.

Let’s be clear: You can’t make up for lost time.

In my latest for the Associated Press, what you need to do in order to make your retirement more comfortable.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

401k-planToday’s top story: Why long-term care insurance is worth the expense. Also in the news: The differences between a 401(k) and a Roth 401(k), how to make yourself a better retirement saver, and keeping an eye out for electricity surge pricing.

Long-Term Care Insurance Is Worth the Expense
Paying now can save a lot later.

You Know About the 401(k) — But What About the Roth 401(k)?
Know the differences.

5 Ways to Make Yourself a Better Retirement Saver
Taking the long view.

Beware of Surge Pricing on Your Electric Bill
Running your air conditioner just got a bit pricier.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Financial-PlanningToday’s top story: How to find the best mortgage rate online. Also in the news: How to set up your first 401(k), what happens if you work after signing up for Social Security, and why we value purchases more when we pay with cash.

How to Find the Best Mortgage Rates and Lenders Online
Comparison shopping.

Class of 2016, Here’s How to Set Up Your First 401(k)
Happy Graduation! Time to focus on retirement.

What Happens if You Work After Signing Up for Social Security?
What you can and cannot collect.

Why We Value Purchases More When We Pay With Cash
The psychology of spending.

Should you save enough to live to 100?

common-retirement-mistakesFirst, you were supposed to die at 85. Then 90. Now 95 and even 100 are common defaults when financial planners tell people how much to save for retirement.

Except that’s nuts.

In the U.S., the typical man at age 65 is expected to live another 18 years. The typical woman, about 20. Yet many financial planners contend we should save as if we’re all going to be centenarians.

In my new column for the Associated Press, why we need to save for the retirement we’re most likely to have.

The Smartest Financial Decision You’ll Ever Make

common-retirement-mistakesThere’s really only one thing young people need know about money: Save for retirement, starting now.

Yes, at some point you’ll want to pay off your debt, have an emergency fund and buy a home. Right now, though, you’re burning through your most limited resource, which is time. You can’t make more of it, you can’t get it back when it’s gone, and you have a limited window to harness its power.

In my latest for NerdWallet, why it’s imperative for young people to start saving for retirement immediately.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: When hybrid long-term care insurance makes sense. Also in the news: How to tell whether your credit card authorized user could become a problem, what pro athletes can teach us about retirement planning, and the 7 habits of highly effective investors.

When Hybrid Long-Term Care Insurance Makes Sense
Planning for the future.

7 Ways to Tell Whether Your Credit Card Authorized User Will Be a Problem
Proceed with caution.

What Pro Athletes Can Teach Us About Retirement Planning
Living below your means can protect your future.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Investors
Using your money wisely.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

common-retirement-mistakesToday’s top story: College counselors spill financial aid secrets. Also in the news: How to tell if you’re on track for retirement, why new grads have a huge retirement savings advantage, and the 401(k) mistakes that could cost you a bundle.

College Counselors Spill 6 Financial Aid Secrets
Get the inside scoop.

Do the Math to Tell If You’re on Track for Retirement
Checking your progress.

New grads have a huge retirement savings advantage
How much will you have in 40 years?

The 401(k) Mistakes That Could Cost You a Bundle
Pay close attention.