Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Determining the best way to do your taxes. Also in the news: Refinancing an FHA loan, what’s next for the stock market, and why now is the time to hunt for higher rates on your bank accounts.

Determining the Best Way to Do Your Taxes
Finding the way that works best for you.

FHA Streamline Refinance: 5 Strict Conditions
Meeting the tough requirements.

Trump’s in, Dow Hits 20,000: What’s Next for the Market?
Looking at the market under a new administration.

Now’s the time: Hunt for higher rates on your bank accounts
It’s a year of rising interest rates.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

financial-toolboxToday’s top story: 7 ways to improve your finances in 2017. Also in the news: How to help your kid graduate from college debt-free, how rising home values can boost your mortgage refinance, and why Americans are blowing it when it comes to personal finance.

7 Ways to Improve Your Finances in 2017
Making the most of the new year.

Help Your Kid Graduate From College Debt-Free
The greatest graduation gift of them all.

Rising Home Values Can Boost Your Mortgage Refinance
You could be able to tap your home equity.

Americans are blowing it on personal finance
Making financial literacy one of your goals.

Q&A: Factors to consider for refinancing into a 15-year mortgage

Dear Liz: I am considering refinancing my home from a 30-year mortgage to a 15-year loan and wondered if it would be a wise decision. I am 57, divorced and make a little over $100,000 a year as a high school teacher (and I plan to keep working until at least age 65). Other than a car loan, I have no debts and an excellent credit rating. I will receive a pretty decent teacher’s pension and I have about $150,000 in mutual funds in retirement accounts. I can afford the larger payment on a shorter loan. Do you think this would be a good move for me?

Answer: For most people, a 30-year mortgage is a good option. People can always make extra principal payments to pay down the loan faster, but the lower monthly payment is easier to handle if they face financial setbacks such as a job loss.

Your employment situation seems pretty stable, though, and you’re in good shape with a pension plus savings. If you can swing the payments, you’d be building equity much faster and while paying less interest. You’ll still have home debt into your 70s, which isn’t ideal, but it’s certainly better than having a mortgage in your 80s.

Q&A: Refinancing an education loan

Dear Liz: You were asked a question about whether it would be wise to refinance a parent PLUS loan through a private lender and you said yes because the interest rates are so much lower. Doesn’t this ignore the benefit of the IRS tax credit? I figured out that my interest rate is effectively a couple of percentage points lower because I get a $2,500 tax credit every year.

Answer: As long as you’re refinancing with another education loan, the interest is still tax deductible. The deduction is “above the line” — meaning you don’t have to itemize to get it. The student loan interest deduction can reduce your taxable income by up to $2,500 if your modified adjusted gross income is less than $80,000 for singles and $160,000 for married couples filing jointly. The amount you can deduct is phased out at higher incomes and disappears after $90,000 for singles and $180,000 for marrieds.

If you’re not clear whether you’re refinancing into an education loan (rather than, say, a personal loan), you should ask your lender.

To clarify, it’s not always a good idea to refinance, even if you get a better rate. That’s because federal education loans have consumer protections that private lenders don’t offer. For example, you can pause your payments for up to three years if you lose your job or have another financial setback. Private lenders may offer hardship deferments, but typically those max out at 12 months.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

refinancingToday’s top story: Mortgage refinance options for people with bad credit. Also in the news: The best cell phone deals for July, steps to financial independence, and 10 personal finance headscratchers.

Mortgage Refinance Options for People With Bad Credit
Hope is not lost.

Best Cell Phone Deals in July
Time for an upgrade?

Five Essential Steps to Financial Independence
Step by step.

10 personal-finance headscratchers that show we’re irrational
Not thinking clearly.

Q&A: Pros and cons of refinancing college loans

Dear Liz: We took out parent PLUS loans to finance our two sons’ college tuition at private universities. We’ve received solicitations from a private lender offering to refinance. What are the pros and cons of doing so?

Answer: It rarely makes sense to replace federal student loans with private loans because the federal version comes with low rates, numerous repayment options, many consumer protections and the possibility of forgiveness. You lose all that when you refinance with a private loan.

Parent PLUS are a different story, however. Not only do they have higher rates (6.84% currently versus 4.29% for direct loans to undergraduates), but PLUS loans have fewer repayment options and no forgiveness.

If you have good credit and a solid employment history, you could dramatically lower your interest rate by refinancing with a private lender. Variable rates start at some lenders start under 2%, and fixed rates start under 4%. If you can’t pay the balance off within a few years, a fixed rate is probably your best option since rising interest rates could otherwise boost your payments.

A few private lenders even offer the option to have your child take over by refinancing your PLUS loan into his or her name.

You can shop for offers at Credible, a multi-lender online marketplace.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Credit report with score on a desk

Credit report with score on a desk

Today’s top story: Americans are confused over credit card fees and rewards. Also in the news: Using refinancing to pay for home renovations, taking one day a month to be your personal finance day, and how to protect your credit score.

Americans Confused Over Credit Card Fees, Rewards
Cardholders are paying extra, losing out on rewards.

Should I Pay for Home Renovations by Refinancing?
Pros and cons.

Pick One Day a Month to Be Your Personal Finance Day
Getting everything done at once.

Avoid these 3 mistakes to protect your credit score
Taking a proactive approach.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to save money by refinancing your mortgage. Also in the news: How to spice up your retirement recipe, avoiding the financial pitfalls of divorce, and must-know money tips for new graduates.

Tips to Save Money by Refinancing Your Mortgage
What to consider when deciding to refinance.

6 key ingredients to spice up your retirement recipe
Strategies for investors.

Avoiding The Financial Pitfalls Of Divorce
Navigating through tough times.

5 Must-Know Money Tips for New Grads
Now comes the hard part.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

imagesToday’s top story: Choosing the best student loan refinancing offer. Also in the news: Taking 15 minutes a month for your financial health, using your 1040 for a retirement savings check-up, and how couples can financially prepare for the inevitable.

How to Choose the Best Student Loan Refinancing Offer for You
Sorting through the options.

15 Minutes a Month to Maintain Financial Health
Easy steps that can build longterm success.

Use Your 1040 For A Retirement Savings And Investment Tax Check-Up
The perfect time to take stock of your finances.

Widow/widower financial preparedness 101: 5 things to do right now
Making a difficult time less complicated.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Student-LoansToday’s top story: How to decide if you should refinance your student loans. Also in the news: Credit card scams to watch out for, money-saving tips for the holidays, and hidden perks in your credit cards.

This Infographic Helps You Decide If You Should Refinance Student Loans
Refinancing could give you some breathing room.

3 Credit Card Scams You Need to Watch Out For
Protect yourself.

5 smart money-saving tips for the holidays
Especially if you’re still paying off last year’s holiday shopping.

8 Perks That Might Be Hiding in Your Credit Cards
What you could be missing out on.

7 simple steps to wise charitable giving
Donating strategically.