Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: Key financial considerations when you live alone. Also in the news: Managing your money while you’re separated from your spouse, determining how much life insurance you really need, and a change in thinking that will help get you out of debt.

Key Financial Considerations When You Live Alone
Important considerations for your life.

3 Tips for Managing Your Money While Separated From Your Spouse
Keeping your finances in order during difficult times.

How Much Life Insurance Do You Really Need?
Keeping yourself protected.

The Shift in Mindset That Will Help You Get Out of Debt
A change in thinking.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How to save money by refinancing your mortgage. Also in the news: How to spice up your retirement recipe, avoiding the financial pitfalls of divorce, and must-know money tips for new graduates.

Tips to Save Money by Refinancing Your Mortgage
What to consider when deciding to refinance.

6 key ingredients to spice up your retirement recipe
Strategies for investors.

Avoiding The Financial Pitfalls Of Divorce
Navigating through tough times.

5 Must-Know Money Tips for New Grads
Now comes the hard part.

Q&A: Social Security divorced spousal benefits

Dear Liz: A friend was told by Social Security that she could not collect spousal benefits on her ex-husband’s work record because she did not have his Social Security number. How can I help her find it?

Answer: Your friend may have run into a new Social Security employee, or at least one who is not well-informed. Social Security says on its website that people who qualify for divorced spousal benefits do not need their exes’ Social Security number as long as they can provide enough identifying information for the agency to locate his record. She does need to have a marriage certificate and divorce decree along with her own birth certificate.

To qualify for divorced spousal benefits, the marriage must have lasted 10 years and your friend must currently be unmarried

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

images (1)Today’s top story: Money milestones to hit while you’re in your 40s. Also in the news: Post-divorce tax deductions, tricks to boost your credit score, and signs you aren’t ready to combine finances with your partner.

Five money milestones to hit while you’re in your 40s
Prepping the road to retirement.

The Tax Deductions You May Qualify for After a Divorce
Maximizing your deductions.

Boost Your Credit Score With This Great Little Trick
Tips to nudge your credit score in the right direction.

5 Signs You Aren’t Ready to Combine Finances with Your Partner
Don’t ignore the warning signs.

Should You Put Your Kids In Debt To Teach Them A Lesson?
Debt as a teaching tool.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Social-Security-benefitsToday’s top story: With the holidays comes identity theft. Also in the news: What divorcees need to know about Social Security, a different way to budget, and how money can wreck your marriage (but it doesn’t have to).

The 12 Scams of Christmas
‘Tis the season to protect your identity.

What Older Divorcees Need to Know About Social Security
Understanding the complexities.

Focus on Cash Flows, Rather than Expenses, to Spend Without a Budget
Static expenses vs itemizing everything.

Yours, Mine, Or Ours? How Money Wrecks Your Marriage
But it doesn’t have to!

10 Things You Need to Know If Your Kid’s Applying for College
Besides kissing your wallet goodbye.

Q&A: Social Security spousal benefits and divorce

Dear Liz: My fiancé was married to a wealthy woman for over 10 years. Will he lose his opportunity to use her earnings record as the basis for his Social Security retirement benefits if we get married?

Answer: The short answer is yes. Spousal benefits for divorced people are available only to those who remain unmarried. Many people confuse spousal benefits with survivors benefits. Survivors benefits for widows, widowers and divorced spouses of the deceased can continue after the recipient remarries, but only if the remarriage occurs after age 60.
You shouldn’t assume that your fiancé’s spousal benefits necessarily will be larger than his own benefit. His ex could have been wealthy without being a high earner. Even if she did, 100% of his own benefit could be worth more than 50% of hers. To find out for sure, he needs to contact the Social Security Administration.