Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: What to do when you get an IRS audit notice. Also in the news: Budgeting for new parents, where to sell your stuff online, and how your credit score is linked to your chance of divorce.

I Got an Audit Notice From the IRS — Now What?
Take a deep breath.

Budgeting for New Parents: From Day Care to College
In it for the long haul.

Where to Sell Your Stuff Online
Getting rid of what you don’t need.

Your Credit Score Is Linked To Your Chance of Divorce
What the two have in common.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Using your tax refund to spring clean your finances. Also in the news: A money conference for women, why the IRS wants their share of your March Madness winnings, and how Millennials can make car buying easier.

Use Your Tax Refund to Spring Clean Your Finances
Tidying up your money.

Lola: A money conference for women.
How to better deal with financial issues unique to women.

You Won! Congratulations — Now Pay Your Taxes
The IRS wants their share of your March Madness winnings.

5 Ways Millennials Can Make Car Buying a Smoother Ride
Making the process easier.

9 Smart Ways to Spend Your Tax Refund
Buying yet another overpriced gadget isn’t one of them.

How Much More It Costs to Own vs. Rent in Your State
Where does your state rank?

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 7 reasons why the IRS will audit you. Also in the news: Big news that could affect your student loans, sneaky ways debt can change how you think, and how the “Once in a Lifetime” mentality screws up your budget.

7 Reasons the IRS Will Audit You
How to avoid triggering an audit.

This News Could Affect Your Student Loans
Heads up.

3 Sneaky Ways Debt Can Change How You Think
Don’t resign yourself to debt.

How a “Once in a Lifetime” Mentality Screws Up Your Budget
Something to watch out for.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Know your rights if the IRS breaks the rules. Also in the news: How to avoid an early withdrawal penalty on a CD, could Amazon Go change the way we shop, and how much community college students save by state.

Know Your Rights if the IRS Breaks the Rules
You can fight back.

How to Avoid a CD Early Withdrawal Penalty
Look for more flexible options.

Tap, Shop, Walk. Could Amazon Go Change the Way We Buy?
Stores without checkout lanes?

How Much Money Community College Students Save, Depending on the State
Where does yours rank?

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: What retirement savers need to know about Trump’s action on the advisor rule. Also in the news: Using your emergency fund to pay off debt, breaking up with your bank, and what to do if the IRS breaks the rules.

What Trump’s Action on Advisor Rule Means for Retirement Savers
The fiduciary rule is now in question.

Emergency Funds: Should You Use Yours to Pay Down Debt?
Making a tough decision.

Sean Talks Money: Don’t Cling to a Bank You Don’t Love
Breaking up with your bank.

Know your rights if the IRS breaks the rules
Taxpayers have rights, too.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailToday’s top story: How small choices can have a big impact on your finances. Also in the news: 9 things that can trigger an IRS audit, how to organize your financial documents, and 10 tax breaks for homeowners.

Small Choices Have a Big Impact on Your Finances
Why some become rich and others stay broke.

9 Things That Could Trigger an IRS Audit
How to avoid a second look.

How to Organize Your Financial Documents
Tackling that huge pile of paper on your desk.

10 homeowner tax breaks you should be taking advantage of
Don’t leave money on the table.

Q&A: Options for paying a big IRS bill

Dear Liz: I sold one mutual fund to invest in another fund with the same company. The tax statement shows this as a capital gain so large that I cannot afford to pay it all in one payment to the IRS. This is a disaster. Is there anything I can do?

Answer: Absolutely. File your tax return on time, since the failure-to-file penalty is much higher than the failure-to-pay penalty. Pay as much as you can when you file the return, and then consider your options.

If you can come up with the remainder within 120 days, then do so. There’s no need to arrange a formal payment plan, but you will owe interest and penalties on the balance until it’s repaid.

If you can’t pay within 120 days, you can ask for an installment agreement. You’ll find an application in most tax software or you can find Form 9465 on the Internal Revenue Service website. You also can try calling the IRS at (800) 829-1040, but prepare for a long time listening to hold music. Budget cuts have left the agency severely short-handed and wait times are considerable.

You also should consider borrowing the money from another source, such as a low-cost personal loan. Another option is to charge what you owe to a low-rate credit card. You’ll pay a small fee for the privilege, but ultimately it may be cheaper than paying interest and penalties to the IRS.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

imagesToday’s top story: How to talk to your kids about money. Also in the news: Shrewd ways to use your tax refund for your future, how to survive an IRS audit, and tips for cancer patients who are worried about the cost of their care.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Money
The sooner the better.

5 shrewd ways to use your tax refund for your future
Your retirement fund will thank you.

How to survive being audited by the IRS
Don’t panic.

7 tips for cancer patients worrying about the cost of their care
Minimizing the stress.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

taxesToday’s top story: Should you pay your taxes with a credit card? Also in the news: Smart money moves for April, tax myths about IRS audits and why having more money won’t fix your financial problems.

You can pay your taxes with credit card, but should you?
The convenience could become costly.

Smart Money Moves for April
Time to spring forward.

10 Tax Myths About IRS Audits That You Shouldn’t Believe
Myth busting the IRS.

More money won’t fix your financial problems if your habits suck
More money, more problems.

Why We No Longer Fear the IRS

gpbh8nungoaljipue96oOur tax laws are complex and often difficult to understand. Tax professionals warn us of the perils of audits. Penalties for getting our taxes wrong can be stiff — up to and including jail for those who deliberately evade the taxman.

So why don’t we fear the IRS?

Clearly, we have some fears about April 15. A recent NerdWallet survey found seven out of 10 taxpayers have concerns about filing their taxes, such as making a mistake (17%), paying too much (15%) and not getting the biggest possible refund (14%).

But only 11% feared getting audited, NerdWallet found. A recent Rasmussen Reports poll put the number at 14%.

In my latest for NerdWallet, why Americans are less afraid of the IRS than they are of reptiles.