Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to manage your investments during the Trump presidency. Also in the news: How to dig out from December’s debt, why ‘Buy Online, Pick Up in Store’ is a double-edged sword, and the first thing you should do after paying off a big debt.

How to Manage Your Investments During the Trump Presidency
Practical suggestions to help stay the course.

How to Dig Out From December’s Debt

‘Buy Online, Pick Up in Store’ Is a Double-Edged Deal
The pros and cons of convenience.

The First Things You Should Do After Paying Off a Big Debt
Don’t dive back into the debt hole.

Holiday debt hangover? Here’s how to fix it

images-2Despite what you often read, credit card debt isn’t typical. One quarter of U.S. households don’t use credit cards at all, and another 35 percent or so regularly pay their balances in full, according to Federal Reserve statistics. Among households that carry credit card balances, the median debt–where half owe more and half owe less–is somewhere around $3,000.

Whopping “average credit card debt” statistics are what grab headlines, though. They’re typically compiled by taking the total amount charged on plastic at the end of the year and dividing it by the number of card-carrying households. Those total charges include amounts that are about to be paid off by us so-called “convenience users,” and often business credit card balances as well. Also, averages can be misleading, since a relatively small number of households carrying a lot of debt can skew the average upward.

If you’re the one with the debt, though, you know it doesn’t feel good. If your balances grew over the holidays, you may be stressing already about how to pay it off. Here are some ideas:

Skip the post-holiday sales. You’ve heard it over and over: You can’t get out of debt if you don’t stop digging. But our brains tells us sales are the exception. We’re saving money! Nope, we’re spending–and adding to our debt stress. Whatever’s on sale likely will be on sale again, so let it go.

Have a no-spend month. I hosted one of these more than a decade ago on MSN, and readers reported saving $300, $400 and more. A no-spend means you spend only on essentials: no eating out, paid entertainment or shopping. You’ll learn frugality skills like planning and making do that can help you save year round.

Check the cushions. You may have money tucked away in various forms–jars of coins, unused gift cards, rewards programs that can be converted to cash back or gift cards. (Sites like Gift Card Granny can help you convert plastic to cash.)

Make weekly credit card payments. Don’t wait until the bill arrives to pay it–start whittling down your balance with regular injections.

Lower your interest rate. If you have good credit, you may be able to qualify for low- or zero-rate balance transfer offers. Use them as a way to speed up your debt repayment.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

22856641_SAToday’s top story: How to tackle your holiday debt. Also in the news: Saving time on your FAFSA, how to deal with debt before retirement, and the best financial tips that can fit on an index card.

Pay Off Your Holiday Bills in This Order
Tackling your holiday debt.

5 Hacks to Save Time on Your 2016 FAFSA
File as soon as possible.

5 Ways to Deal With Debt Before Retirement
Preparing for life on a fixed income.

Can The Best Financial Tips Fit On An Index Card?
4 x 6 inches of guidance.

12 Predictions For How Tech Will Change Your Financial Life In 2016
A glimpse into the future.