Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Does the CFPB still care about students? Also in the news: How to use your tax return to map out a better financial future, paring down the price of a move to a new state, and 6 strategies to get a divorce without going broke.

Does the CFPB Still Care About Students?
Borrowers could be losing protection.

Use Your Tax Return to Map Out a Better Financial Future
Using your tax refund strategically.

Pare Down the Price of a Move to a New State
Finding ways to cut costs.

6 strategies to get a divorce without going broke
How to avoid a big bill.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Where college students can find emergency money, food and housing. Also in the news: 8 ways to get cheap movie tickets, how the new CFPB prepaid card rule affects you, and your 2018 HSA contribution limit just changed (again).

Where College Students Can Find Emergency Money, Food and Housing
You’re not alone.

8 Ways to Get Cheap Movie Tickets
More money for snacks.

CFPB Prepaid Card Rule: How It Affects You
New protections.

Your 2018 HSA Contribution Limit Just Changed (Again)
A $50 increase.

Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: 5 essential money tips for Generation X. Also in the news: Sales tax holidays, the best ways to send money to your college student, and why Americans are more financially content.

5 Essential Money Tips for Generation X
The clock is ticking towards 50.

Sales Tax Holidays Save Shoppers Money on Back-to-School
Find out if your state has one.

Best Ways to Send Money to Your College Student
Don’t pay excessive fees.

Americans are more financially content than they’ve been in a decade

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How students can avoid common bank and credit card fees. Also in the news: What to do if you can’t get a student credit card, how to lessen the financial pains of moving, and how to photograph your house for Airbnb.

How Students Can Avoid Common Bank and Credit Card Fees
Don’t pay the bank to access your money.

What to Do If You Can’t Get a Student Credit Card
A look at the alternatives.

Ask Brianna: How Can I Lessen the Financial Pain of Moving?
Painless ways to cut costs.

How to Photograph Your House for Airbnb
Attracting more renters.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Budgeting for college students. Also in the news: What to do when the GI Bill won’t cover college, 6 ways to travel cheaply, and why frugal retirees are ditching the 4% rule and hoarding their savings instead.

Budgeting for College Students: Where to Start
You don’t have to live on ramen.

What to Do When the GI Bill Won’t Cover College
Finding alternatives.

6 Smart Ways to Travel Cheaply
You don’t have to go overboard.

Frugal retirees ditch 4% rule, hoard savings instead
Why they’re making this choice.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Student-LoansToday’s top story: A 3-step plan for new grads with student debt. Also in the news: Answers to money questions from college students, student loan mythbusting, and how to cut the costs of raising a baby.

A 3-Step Plan for New Grads With Student Debt
Congratulations! Now, pay up.

Money Talk: How to Go From ? to ?
Answers to money questions from college students.

4 Student Loan Myths You Might Believe
Mythbusting.

Old school vs. new school: How to cut the costs of raising a baby
Keeping costs down.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

hidden-fees1Today’s top story; How a Trump win could impact college students. Also in the news: Tips on caring for aging parents, what you need to know about online lending services, and financial apps that will save you money this summer.

4 Ways a Trump Win Could Impact College Students
Looking ahead to a possible Trump presidency.

Caring for Aging Parents: Tips for the Sandwich Generation
Finding time to take care of yourself.

What You Should Know About Online Lending Services
Fast money could come at a very steep price.

7 Financial Apps to Save You Money This Summer
Savings at your fingertips.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

smartphones_financeToday’s top story: Apps to help you manage your household finances. Also in the news: Why not saving enough for retirement in your 20’s could spell doom, what college students need to know about money, and the pros and cons of using balance transfers to pay down credit card debt.

The Best Tools for Managing Household Finances
New apps to help keep your household finances running smoothly.

Why Saving Too Little For Retirement In Your 20s Is A Bet You’ll Die Young And Broke
A little straight talk.

What College Students Need to Know About Money
So that they don’t die young and broke.

The pros and cons of using a balance transfer to pay off debt.
Beware accumulated interest.

How Often Can I Apply for New Credit Cards Without Hurting My Credit Scores?
The cost of a hard inquiry.

Should you send your kid to college with a credit card?

teen-creditSavvy parents know the importance of building a good credit history. They also know that paying with a credit card can be more convenient and secure than other methods.

But personal finance expert Janet Bodnar has one word of advice for parents thinking of providing their college-bound children with a credit card: don’t.

“It’s dangerous and it’s not necessary,” said Bodnar, editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and mother of three college graduates.

On the other hand, personal finance columnist Kathy Kristof—who also writes for Kiplingers and who has sent two children to college—says students who have been taught how to handle money can be responsible credit card users. She added her kids as authorized users to one of her credit cards, and said it’s worked out well.

You can read more in my Reuters column this week, “Start college kids with bank accounts, not credit cards.” Bodnar has more tips for parents at “Rules for raising money-smart kids.”

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t think college is worth it? Read this.

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailThe earnings gap between young people with and without college degrees is the widest in half a century. Recent college graduates are more likely to be employed full time and far less likely to be unemployed than high school grads.

And all that debt college grads had to incur? The vast majority of college grads aged 25 to 32–72 percent–say their education has already paid off. Another 17 percent believe it will in the future.

Those are just a few of the fascinating statistics from the latest Pew Research survey, aptly titled “The Rising Cost of Not Going to College.” Read, learn, and use the statistics to combat those who say a college education isn’t a good value.