Q&A: How does a lottery winner find a financial advisor she can trust?

Dear Liz: I’m a middle-aged, single, childless woman who won a very nice lottery prize. I took the “cash value” option and after paying federal tax, I was left with $1.2 million. I would like to pay cash for a home, have a tidy nest egg put aside and have money for travel and other occasional luxuries. I also receive a disability pension of $1,800 a month, which includes medical and dental benefits. Do I need a financial planner at this point? I was figuring I knew what to do, but may need an expert to help me go about doing it.

Answer: One of the things you’ll notice, if you haven’t already, is how people will come out of the woodwork to “help” you with your money. Some position themselves as advisors, while others will be offering “business opportunities” or just looking for handouts.

You would be smart to seek out a trustworthy fee-only financial advisor to help make the most of your money and to deal with all those who want to part you from it. The phrase “That sounds interesting — let me run it past my financial planner” can short-circuit a lot of importuning.

The planner can help you determine a safe spending rate for your windfall and discuss some issues you may not have considered, such as the need for more liability insurance (since you’re now a bigger lawsuit target) and a plan to pay for long-term care.

The advisor you want won’t be found at your doorstep or in your email box, begging for your business. The best planners are too busy advising to run after lottery winners. You can find referrals to fee-only planners at the National Assn. of Personal Financial Advisors (www.napfa.org) and the Garrett Planning Network (www.garrettplanningnetwork.com). Interview at least three and make sure they’re willing to sign a fiduciary oath to put your interests first.

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