Q&A: Going without health insurance isn’t wise

Dear Liz: You recently wrote about early retirees going abroad for their pre-Medicare years in order to get more affordable healthcare coverage. Why did you not bother to even mention the COBRA option that is often available to workers upon retirement? And by the way, some of us prefer to self-insure in our pre-Medicare years and even opt to not buy Part B coverage once we were eligible. Self-insuring is not for the sick, only the healthy, but there is a place for this never-mentioned option and it certainly reinforces healthy lifestyle choices.

Answer: COBRA was mentioned as an option in the original column, which addressed the retirement concerns of a woman 10 years younger than her husband. COBRA allows employees to continue their healthcare coverage for up to 18 months, so someone who is 63½ could use COBRA to bridge the gap until Medicare.

The coverage isn’t cheap because the retiree will have to pay the full premium without the employer subsidy, plus a 2% administrative fee. Anyone retiring earlier than 63½, including the younger spouse in the original column, still could face years without coverage once COBRA is exhausted.

And going without health insurance isn’t wise. Regardless of how healthy you currently happen to be, you’re one serious accident or illness away from disaster. Self-insuring can make sense for the smaller ongoing expenses of primary care. At a minimum, though, people should have a high-deductible plan that protects them from catastrophically high medical bills.

The decision to forgo Part B of Medicare may be an expensive one, as well. (For those who don’t know, Part A of Medicare is free for beneficiaries and covers hospital visits. Part B covers doctor visits, preventative care and medical equipment, among other expenses, and requires paying a monthly premium. Most people pay $134 a month for Part B coverage, although singles with incomes over $85,000 and married people with incomes over $170,000 pay higher amounts.) A permanent 10% penalty is tacked on to monthly premiums for every 12 months you were eligible for Part B but didn’t sign up.

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Comments

  1. Jug Bedi says:

    Liz, I retired from Federal job in March 2012 and my wife who is 8.5 yrs younger to me also retired in July 2012. I carry health coverage from my federal job and my wife is covered in the plan. But my issue is our payments, we pay a total of $829 per month, which includes $135 each for plan B and remaining $559 for Federal Health Plan. It is a huge burden on us. Although we can afford it, BUT we want to make sure that we are not paying too much money for nothing.