How you can benefit from the robo-advisor price war

iStock_000014977164MediumDigital investment advisor Wealthfront snagged some headlines this week by dropping its minimum investment from $5,000 to $500 and calling out its competitors, particularly Betterment, for charging too much.

Which is kind of unfortunate, because it could leave people with the impression that Betterment is gouging people, when it (like most of the other robo-advisors) charges a fraction of what other advisors do, and Betterment has no minimum investment requirement.

Betterment’s charge ranges from .15% to .35%. On accounts under $10,000, Betterment charges a minimum monthly fee of $3 unless investors set up auto-deposit. Wealthfront manages the first $10,000 you invest for free, and charges one-quarter of one percent (.25%) above that.

By contrast, many human advisors charge 1%, or even more, to manage investments. If you’re not familiar with robo-advisors, you can read about them here and here.

Roboadvisors, in other words, are providing the cheap, conflict-free investment management that many people, especially those without big portfolios, have been waiting for. They’re even a possible lower-cost solution for those with big portfolios, now that Vanguard is offering a robo-advisor service paired with access to human financial advisors for a .3% annual charge.

If you’re intrigued by the idea of low-cost investment management, don’t let a little dust-up between competitors dissuade you. Check out your options and make up your own mind.

 

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