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Budgeting in the big city

Jan 30, 2012 | | Comments Comments Off

Dear Liz: You’ve written about the 50/30/20 budget structure that people should strive to achieve. As you said, it’s a difficult feat. But here’s my question: How does one even come close when you live in a major metropolitan area? In my particular case, home values in my area have remained intact in many places and demand for apartments is so high that vacancy rates are the lowest in the nation. To get into a relatively safe neighborhood with access to public transit, rent is over $1,000 with a roommate or two. Finding that 50/30/20 balance seems impossible for people who live here and we can’t all just relocate.

Answer: If you live in a high-cost area but don’t have a high income, you’ll need to get creative if you want to keep your “must have” expenses—shelter, food, transportation, child care, minimum loan payments and insurance—under 50% of your after-tax income.

Many people in high-cost areas devote 40% or more of their incomes to shelter costs, which makes it all but impossible to have enough money left over for their “wants” (clothes, vacations, gifts and other non-necessities that should consumer 30% of their after-tax incomes savings, according to the 50/30/20 plan) or savings and debt repayment (which should consume 20% of your after-tax income under the plan). The result is a perpetually unbalanced budget, which often leads to more debt and lots of anxiety.

But people have come up with various solutions to better balance their budgets. Blogger Donna Freedman was an apartment manager for several years, which helped lower her shelter costs. Fred Ecks, who retired in his 40s, lived on a boat to reduce his rent in notoriously high-cost San Francisco. Other people have exchanged their services for free or reduced rent—by babysitting or serving as a companion to an elderly person.

If you can’t find a solution that lowers your housing costs, you have two options: continue to live with a lopsided budget, and accept that you may never be able to achieve a balanced financial life, or move to a place where you can make the math work.

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Categories : Budgeting, Q&A