Thursday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Plug in 3 numbers to plan your financial future. Also in the news: 10 questions to ask a financial advisor, how to stop scammers from stealing your down payment, and shopping around for car loans.

Plug in 3 Numbers to Plan Your Financial Future
A retirement calculator can help.

10 Questions to Ask a Financial Advisor
Finding the best match.

Stop Scammers From Stealing Your Down Payment

Don’t Forget, You Can Shop Around for Car Loans
You don’t have to accept the first offer.

How to buy the last house you’ll ever buy

My husband and I bought what we thought was a starter home 20 years ago. Now we think of it as our “forever” home, where we plan to retire and live out the rest of our days.

We got lucky, because most of the features that make our place good for “aging in place” — the single-story layout, open design, wide doorways — weren’t on our must-have list when we were newlyweds.

We’re not the only people who didn’t think far enough into our future. The vast majority of homebuyers and remodelers don’t consider what it might be like to grow old in their homes, says Richard Duncan, executive director of the Ronald L. Mace Universal Design Institute, a nonprofit in Asheville, North Carolina, that promotes accessible design for housing, public buildings and parks. In my latest for the Associated Press, what you should take into consideration for the future when buying a home.

Wednesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Mad at Equifax? Use that fuel to boost your cybersecurity. Also in the news: What to weight when considering a secured credit card, what not to do on your Facebook small business page, and 3 mistakes to avoid when picking a Medicare plan in open enrollment.

Mad at Equifax? Use That Fuel to Boost Your Cybersecurity
Batten down the hatches.

What to Weigh When Considering a Secured Credit Card
Things to watch out for.

What Not to Do on Your Facebook Small-Business Page
Setting the right tone.

Avoid these 3 mistakes when picking a Medicare plan during open enrollment
Choose wisely.

Tuesday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: The scariest thing to find on your credit report. Also in the news: How to spend your day when you’re unemployed, advocates praise student loan scam crackdown, and how to get your student loans back on course.

The Scariest Thing to Find on Your Credit Reports
Beware of surprises.

How to Spend Your Day When You’re Unemployed
Getting off the couch is a good start.

Advocates Praise Student Loan Scam Crackdown, Demand More
The tip of the iceberg.

Ask Brianna: How do I get my student loans back on course?
Course correction.

Monday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: Feds, 11 states crack down on student loan scams. Also in the news: Adding a loan to your shopping cart, 5 top benefits of a Roth IRA, and setting your holiday spending budget in October.

Feds, 11 States Crack Down on Student Loan Scams
Cracking down.

Should You Add a Loan to Your Shopping Cart?
A new option at the register.

5 Top Benefits of a Roth IRA
What you should know.

Get Christmas budget set for holiday spending in October
The holidays will be here before you know it.

Q&A: How to divvy up your wealth when you don’t agree with one offspring’s life choices

Dear Liz: I am reasonably well off thanks to hard work, some luck and a hard-earned (by my mother) inheritance. I don’t spend much because I prefer a simple life, so the money has piled up over the decades.

I have two children. One has a college degree, a decent job, and is saving for retirement. The other dropped out, became an actor and lives hand-to-mouth, getting very little paid-acting work. I want to help my kids while I’m alive, not wait to leave them money. I will help my worker bee to buy a home but I am at a loss how to help my actor. I hate to reward a lifestyle of “I can’t work a 9-to-5 job because I need to be free to audition.” On the other hand, don’t affluent parents help their artistic kids pursue their dreams?

What kind of financial advisor or family dynamics expert can I consult? Do you have any suggestions? I don’t need a money manager as the funds are handled well already. I need help to disburse funds in keeping with my values.

Answer: Talk to your estate planning attorney. If you don’t have one, get one. These professionals do more than draw up wills and trusts to distribute your assets after you’re gone. They also can help advise you about disbursements during your lifetime, including any gift tax implications. A fee-only financial planner who charges by the hour could be another good resource for you.

In answer to your question about affluent parents, some do help their children pursue dreams that aren’t wildly remunerative. The parents might supplement the income of an altruistic daughter who wants to teach in a low-income school or a talented son who needs time to build up a portfolio of artwork for a gallery show. It’s the parents’ choice, obviously, and there’s certainly no requirement they support career choices they think are questionable.

You have many options to be fair to your kids without enabling them. For example, you could put aside an amount equal to the down payment you’re giving your daughter and let your son know the money’s available when he’s “ready” to buy a home. That is so much nicer than saying, “When you snap out of your delusion that you’re going to make a living in a field where so few actually do.”

Q&A: Obsessing over taxes is foolish

Dear Liz: Most of your articles are from people who have not yet retired. I am retired and always expected to be making less money now than when I was working. But the opposite has happened. I am making almost twice as much and I have a lot of money in stocks, which have increased dramatically. I want to travel and use that money but anything I sell will be taxed at the 25% rate. Any ideas how to get my money out and be able to use it?

Answer: Sure. Place a sell order, set aside 25% for taxes and enjoy your life while you still have a life to enjoy. If you’d like to reduce your yearly tax bill, consider bumping up your charitable contributions to help those who aren’t so fortunate.

Paying taxes is not fun, but obsessing about ways to avoid them or letting them dictate your decisions is foolish. You’ll still be far better off than you expected to be after you pay Uncle Sam, and you’ll have the cash to do what you want. So do it.

Q&A: Hard to predict tax rates

Dear Liz: I read your column answer to the 40-year-old who asked about regular 401(k) versus Roth 401(k) contributions. Obviously, the answer has more moving parts than you have space for. However, using before-tax dollars for the 401(k) gives him a small break now, but when he hits 70 1/2, those dollars will impact the taxability of his Social Security benefits. He could contribute to the 401(k) with after-tax dollars, get the company match and avoid that impact 30 years in the future, right?

Answer: The “right” answer requires knowing what tax rates will be 30 years in the future, at a time when no one is entirely sure what tax rates will be next year. Which means the smart approach is to hedge one’s bets. Given the original reader’s current financial situation, that translates into focusing most contributions into the pretax 401(k) but also making contributions to the Roth. That will give him some flexibility to control his tax bill in retirement without going “all in” on the bet that his tax rate then will be higher than it is now.

Friday’s need-to-know money news

Today’s top story: How to mend holes in your budget with a little needle and thread. Also in the news: Understanding online loans, the cybersecurity best practices for small businesses, and a 2% boost is on the way for Social Security in 2018.

Mend Holes in Your Budget With a Little Needle and Thread
Easy repair measures.

Understanding Online Loans
Reading the fine print.

Cybersecurity Best Practices for Small Businesses
Protecting your digital assets.

Social Security benefits to get 2% boost in 2018
A small raise is in the future.

Why NFL players go broke, and what you can learn

Terrell Owens originally was famous for his many National Football League records and over-the-top touchdown celebrations. But he’s also famous for running through most of the $80 million he made during his 15-year career, thanks in part to bad investments and business deals.

“Having a lot of money it’s good but at the same time you have to be smart with it,” Owens says. “You have to really find the right people to help you manage that money going down the road.”

Sports Illustrated once estimated that 78 percent of NFL players end up broke or under financial stress after they retire. In an interview with NerdWallet, Owens and his friend Eric Dickerson, the Hall of Fame running back most famous for his time with the Los Angeles Rams, talked about their experiences and what young athletes should know about building a solid financial future.