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Are prepaid cards good for an allowance?

Sep 12, 2013 | | Comments Comments Off

Dear Liz: My son is 12 and receives a regular monthly allowance that I’ve been giving to him in cash. I think it might be time for a checking account. I would like to teach him about using a debit card and not overdrawing his account. All the banks that I have called will not open an account for a minor, even a joint account. I’ve heard about prepaid cards being used for allowances, but I’m concerned about the fees.

Answer: You’re right to be concerned. You wouldn’t be teaching financial responsibility — the whole point of an allowance — if you gave him a prepaid card larded with fees to access his own money.

Prepaid cards, also known as prepaid debit or reloadable cards, typically aren’t linked to a checking account as regular debit cards would be. Instead, you can “load” them with cash in a variety of ways and then use the card to spend that money wherever regular debit cards are accepted. Many prepaid cards also can be used to withdraw cash at ATMs.

Unfortunately, many issuers charge fees to open, use and close their cards. Monthly “maintenance” fees and fees to replace cards or talk to customer service are common. Some of the most expensive cards are the ones endorsed by celebrities. Those marketing expenses have to be recouped somehow, and fat endorsement contracts often seem to be paid for with higher-than-average fees.

Anisha Sekar, vice president of credit and debit products for card comparison site NerdWallet, recommends two cards for allowances: the Bluebird from American Express and the Chase Liquid.

The Chase Liquid card doesn’t charge most of the usual fees. There’s no fee for activating a card, closing an account, getting paper statements or paying bills. The card can be loaded with money for free at a Chase bank branch or Chase ATM. Withdrawing cash at a Chase branch or Chase ATM is also free. The monthly fee is $4.95, but it’s still one of the cheapest cards available, she said.

The Bluebird doesn’t charge a monthly fee, and activating the card is free if you apply online. The card allows free ATM withdrawals within the MoneyPass network if the cardholder is enrolled in direct deposit; other withdrawals incur a $2 fee. The card can be loaded for free from a bank account or by using cash or a debit card at a Wal-Mart. Loading with a debit card costs $2.

You’ll still face age limits, but there’s a work-around. Most cards have to be opened by someone 18 or older. A child must typically be 15 or older just to have his name on the account as a joint user. (With the Bluebird the age limit is 13.) So you would have to open the card in your own name and then give it to your son to use.

Another option may be to simply wait a year. Some national banks, including Wells Fargo and Chase, offer teen checking accounts for those 13 and older, although the accounts may not be available in all areas.

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Categories : Banking, Kids & Money, Q&A